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Young and Healthy are Not Interested in Health Insurance

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The Affordable Care Act brings help and benefits to America's uninsured; even though the law's long term success is still in question. Kathleen Sebelius, the health secretary had announced in January that from the month of October last year to end of December more than 2.2 million people had signed up for health insurance under Obamacare's health exchanges. Unfortunately only one forth of them were between ages 18 - 24 as more than half were between 45 - 64 ...

Scientists Build Heart Tissue That Beats

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Tissue that closely mimics natural heart muscle that beats - not only in a lab dish but also when implanted into animals has been engineered by Harvard Medical School scientists. "Repairing damaged hearts could help millions of people around the world live longer, healthier lives," Harvard researcher Nasim Annabi said. Right now, the best treatment option for patients with major heart damage is an organ transplant. But there ...

Home Remedies for Peptic Ulcer

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Home remedies offer you herbal and natural method to treat ulcers effectively. Follow these simple home remedies to get rid of stomach ulcers.

Teenager Dies of Cervical Cancer, Denied Smear Test for Being too Young

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A teenage model who died from cervical cancer this weekend was denied smear test for cervical cancer as doctors thought she was too young for the disease and the law does not allow a woman below 25 to undergo the test. According to doctors, cervical cancer is extremely rare in women under 25. But Sophie Jones, 19, had severe stomach pain for months. And in spite of asking, she was not allowed to undergo smear test that would have diagnosed her cancer. Doctors said ...

Experts Say Coffee Causes Dehydration is a Myth

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Coffee consumption can help with hydration, contributing to daily fluid intake, suggests expert. During Nutrition and Hydration Week, which started March 21 and goes on till Friday, members of the British Coffee Association, an organisation of the coffee industry in Britain, addressed the common misconception that people have about coffee. According to their latest findings, caffeine, at levels consumed moderately throughout the day, is ...

Owl Monkeys Faithful to Partners: Penn Study

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Genetic maternity and paternity tests have revealed that philandering often takes place even in animals that appear to "mate for life", and true monogamy is very rare in animal kingdom. Yet a new study by University of Pennsylvania researchers shows that Azara's owl monkeys (iAotus azarae/i) are unusually faithful. The investigation of 35 offspring born to 17 owl monkey pairs turned up no evidence of cheating; the male and female monkeys that cared for the young ...

Sensitivity to Performance-Enhancing Drugs is a Thousand Times More With New Method

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The doctors and scientists were waging a battle behind the scenes of last month's winter Olympics to make sure no one had an unfair advantage from banned performance-enhancing drugs. Now, for the first time, researchers have unveiled a new weapon - a test for doping compounds that is a thousand times more sensitive than those used today. The team described the approach in one of more than 10,000 presentations at the 247th National Meeting (and) Exposition of the American ...

Interaction of Fried Foods With Genes to Influence Body Weight Found by Experts

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Eating fried foods more than four times a week had twice the effect on body mass index for people with higher genetic risk scores compared to those with lower scores, as shown in a study. In other words, genetic makeup can inflate the effects of bad diet, says an accompanying editorial. It is well known that both fried food consumption and genetic variants are associated with adiposity (fatness). However, the interaction between these two risk factors in relation ...

NHS Sight Tests Lead to Waste Due to Referrals With Insignificant Abnormalities

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Apart from trauma and orthopedics, ophthalmology receives more NHS outpatient referrals than any other specialty, says Michael Clarke, Consultant Ophthalmologist at Newcastle Eye Centre. He says that opticians are constrained by legislation to refer patients to a medical practitioner if abnormalities are found at an NHS sight test. However, the testing done at NHS sight tests has become more complex and many patients are now referred with clinically insignificant ...

Inappropriate Therapy Given to One-Third Patients With Bloodstream Infections

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The three major challenges that the community hospitals face include high prevalence of S. aureus bacteria, ineffective antibiotics given to one-third patients with bloodstream infections and growing drug resistance, as found by researchers at Duke Medicine. The findings, published March 18, 2014, in the journal iPLOS ONE/i, provide the most comprehensive look at bloodstream infections in community hospitals to date. While the majority of people in need of medical ...

Genetic Makeup Determines Risk of Obesity from Regular Consumption of Fried Foods

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The risk of obesity and related chronic diseases from eating fried foods is higher in people with genetic predisposition than those with a lower genetic risk, found in a new study from researchers from Harvard School of Public Health, Brigham and Women''s Hospital, and Harvard Medical School. It is the first study to show that the adverse effects of fried foods may vary depending on the genetic makeup of the individual. "Our study shows that a higher genetic risk ...

One-Third Patients With Bloodstream Infections are Given Inappropriate Therapy

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The challenges facing community hospitals in treating patients with bloodstream infections include growing drug resistance, high prevalence of iS. aureus/i bacteria and ineffective antibiotics prescribed to one in three patients, reveal researchers at Duke Medicine. The findings, published March 18, 2014, in the journal iPLOS ONE/i, provide the most comprehensive look at bloodstream infections in community hospitals to date. While the majority of people ...

Study Shows Why Dark Chocolate is Beneficial to Health

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Mystery behind the health benefits of dark chocolate has been solved by scientists. The researchers have said that certain bacteria in the stomach gobble the chocolate and ferment it into anti-inflammatory compounds that are good for the heart. The team tested three cocoa powders using a model digestive tract, comprised of a series of modified test tubes, to simulate normal digestion. They then subjected the non-digestible materials to anaerobic ...

Vitamin D and LDL - Cholesterol Levels: Is There a Link?

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A recent study from the journal iMenopause/i suggests that vitamin D may be associated with a reduction in the levels of bad cholesterol. This could therefore benefit the heart. a href="http:www.medindia.net/patients/patientinfo/VitaminD.htm" target="_blank" class="vcontentshlink"Vitamin D/a is not merely a vitamin; it is more of a hormone. The effects of vitamin D in maintaining bones are well known. Vitamin D has also been used to prevent ...

US Archives Show History by Pen: Signings of Times

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The autographs, the bold and forceful one of Joseph Stalin, Unaffected and readily legible of Harry Truman and formal and unflappable one of Winston Churchil, displayed at US National Archives. The autographs of World War II's Big Three leaders -- etched on a program to a string orchestra concert during a break from their conference in Potsdam -- are on display at the US National Archives in a new exhibition that aims to look at history through penmanship. The ...

Survey Says Women Half as Likely as Men to Study Science

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A recent study finds women are being put off careers in science by stereotypes and are less than half as likely as men to apply for degrees in the field. A young woman in Britain, France, Germany, Japan, Spain and the United States has on average a 35 percent probability to enrol in a scientific undergraduate degree, compared to a 77 percent chance for young men, the research found. "Parity is still far from being reached," said the report by The ...

Pancreatic Cancer Survival Rates Boost With Swedish Test

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A new method for diagnosing pancreatic cancer at a much earlier stage than currently possible has been developed by Swedish researchers, the University of Gothenburg said Tuesday. The test detects the first signs of the deadly disease with 97 percent accuracy, which researchers hope will help improve the low survival rate among those diagnosed. Only five percent of patients with pancreatic cancer survive more than five years after their diagnosis as ...

Cholesterol-reducing Drug Simvastatin may Help Multiple Sclerosis Sufferers Reports Lancet Study

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Using a cheap drug simvastatin that usually controls blood cholesterol may also slow progression of later-stage multiple sclerosis (MS), reveals a study published in leading general medical journal The Lancet. Scientists found some evidence to suggest that simvastatin may help fight MS a decade ago, but further small-scale trials did not back up the findings. Now, a larger study says there are encouraging signs that the cholesterol-reducing drug can ...

Anti-virus Drug Tamiflu Cuts H1N1 Flu Death Risk by 25 Percent

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A study showed on Wednesday anti-virus drug Tamiflu reduced the risk of death from flu by a quarter among adults who took Tamiflu drug during the 2009-2010 H1N1 influenza pandemic. The findings, published in leading general medical journal The Lancet, should be a useful guide to doctors weighing options for treating flu, the authors said. The research collated data from 78 studies, covering more than 29,000 patients in 38 different countries, admitted ...

World's Richest Photography Prize Bagged by Chinese Amateur

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The world's richest photography award is bagged by a Chinese amateur whose image was that of a makeshift classroom in a poor village in the southeast of his country. Construction entrepreneur Fu Yang Zhou, 54, won the (Dollar) 120,000 top prize in the annual Hamdan International Photography Awards (HIPA) in Dubai. "I took this photograph in the home of the mayor of an extremely poor village in Jiangxi province, where classes were being held for the village children," ...

Women Using Surrogates Cannot be Granted Maternity Leave: EU Top Court

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No legal right to maternity leave for women using surrogate mothers to have a child when the baby is born, the European Court of Justice ruled on Tuesday. The European Union's highest court said EU "law does not establish a right to paid leave equal to maternity leave or adoption leave" for women having a child by a surrogate. At the same time, EU member states are free to apply more accommodating rules if they choose to do so, it added. The ...

Decreased Risk of Death Among ICU Patients With Severe Sepsis: Study

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There was a decrease in the risk of death among critically ill patients in Australia and New Zealand with severe sepsis or septic shock, findings that were accompanied by changes in the patterns of discharge of intensive care unit (ICU) patients to home, rehabilitation, and other hospitals, reveals a study appearing in iJAMA/i. The study is being released early to coincide with its presentation at the International Symposium on Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine. Severe ...

New Study Finds No Evidence That Vitamin D Supplements Reduce Depression

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New research conducted by researchers do not indicate whether vitamin D deficiency causes depression or vice versa. These studies also do not examine whether vitamin D supplementation improves depression. A systematic review of clinical trials that have examined the effect of vitamin D supplementation on depression found that few well-conducted trials of vitamin D supplementation for depression have been published and that the majority of these show little ...

'Increasing Trend of Shifting Patients at Night is Dehumanising'

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The practice of moving patients from one bed to another at night has gone up in the past five years because of increasing demand for NHS beds, revealed figures. As per the figures, nearly 200,000 patients in a year are shifted between hospital wards at night. A Freedom of Information request revealed that approximately 195,372 people at 58 trusts in England were moved between 11 pm and 6 am last year. The request also found out that the number of patients ...