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Facts on Teenage Pregnancy

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Teenage pregnancy is a pregnancy that occurs in women below the age of 20. Teen pregnancies carry great health risks to both the mother and the baby.

Early Spread of Breast Cancer can be Caught Now

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The spread of the cancer from one part of the body is even more deadly than its growth in one place. It moves with stealth and can go undetected for months or years. But a new technology that uses "nano-flares" has the potential to catch these lurking, mobilized tumor cells early on. Today, scientists presented the latest advances in nano-flare technology as it applies to the detection of metastatic breast cancer cells. The report was one of more than 10,000 at ...

Cell's Ability to Regenerate Tracked Down by Vanderbilt Diabetes Researchers

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The evidence of regenerating capacity of insulin-secreting beta cells of pancreas which are either killed or have become dysfunctional in the two main forms of diabetes, has been found by Vanderbilt University scientists. The surprising finding, posted online recently by iCell Metabolism/i, suggests that by understanding how regeneration occurs, scientists one day may be able to stop or reverse the rising tide of diabetes, which currently affects more than 8 ...

Risk of Psychological Problems Increases With Critical Illness

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While more and more people survive critical illness and accidents, the hospitalization where the patient has received mechanical ventilation can have serious consequences, shows a Danish-American survey. Of course, the good news is that more and more patients survive critical illness and treatment using ventilators. But at the same time, the bad news is that we have now documented that the ventilator patients have a considerable risk of developing psychological ...

Pesticide Poisoning of Africa's Wildlife Examined

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The silent, effective and cheap poisons that are dangerously used in Africa as pesticides and illegal poaching also contribute to killing unintended wildlife, reveals a study in iAnnals of the New York Academy of Sciences/i. Africa has a long history of using poison, both for early tribal warfare and for hunting. Synthetic poisons however were introduced, like so many things, by European colonialists in the 19th century. In southern Africa colonial administrators ...

Scientists Identify New Drug Target for Controlling High Blood Sugar

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A new potential therapeutic target for controlling high blood sugar has been discovered by researchers. Researchers showed that lipid molecules called phosphatidic acids enhance glucose production in the liver. These findings suggest that inhibiting or reducing production of phosphatidic acids may do the opposite. Senior author Dr. Anil Agarwal, Professor of Internal Medicine, said that their study establishes a role for phosphatidic acids in enhancing ...

New Tool That Pinpoints Genetic Sources Of Disease Discovered

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Novel tool developed by scientists could help disease trackers find patterns in those overlays that could offer clues to the causes of and possible treatments for complex genetic conditions, including many cancers and metabolic disorders. "By showing the connections between genetic variants and epigenetic information, we''re providing epidemiologists with a road map," says Andrew Feinberg, M.D., M.P.H., a Gilman Scholar, the King Fahd Professor of Medicine and ...

Playing Science-based Smartphone Gaming App Helps Reduce Anxiety

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Playing scientific mobile gaming app for 25 minutes could help lower anxiety, says study. According to a research published in Clinical Psychological Science, 'gamifying' a scientifically-supported intervention could offer measurable mental health and behavioral benefits for people with relatively high levels of anxiety. The game is based on an emerging cognitive treatment for anxiety called attention-bias modification training (ABMT) and involves ...

Risk Factors of Violent Radicalization Includes Youth, Wealth and Education

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The risk factors associated with violent radicalization include youth, wealth and being in full-time education, as found in a new research from Queen Mary University of London. Contrary to popular views - religious practice, health and social inequalities, discrimination, and political engagement showed no links. The pioneering research assessed population prevalence of sympathies for terrorist acts - a key marker of vulnerability to violent radicalisation - and ...

Improving Survival or Preventing Eye Loss Not Always Possible With Early Detection of Childhood Eye Cancer

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The early identification and treatment of Unilateral retinoblastoma, the most common form of childhood eye cancer, does not seem to improve survival or stage of the disease, say researchers at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health in partnership with the Hospital Infantil de Mexico. The results appear online in the journal iCancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers (and) Prevention/i. Because retinoblastoma is easily detectable by shining a light into a child's ...

Identifying Triple-Negative Breast, Oropharyngeal and Lung Cancers Using Big Data

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A "Big Data" analysis has been taken up by researchers at Case Western Reserve University and colleagues to predict if a patient is suffering from aggressive triple-negative breast cancer, slower-moving cancers or non-cancerous lesions with 95 percent accuracy. If the tiny patterns they found in magnetic resonance images prove consistent in further studies, the technique may enable doctors to use an MRI scan to diagnose more aggressive cancers earlier and fast track ...

Risk for Respiratory Failure in Pregnant Women can be Identified With Ultrasound: Study

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The risk for respiratory failure in a pregnant woman with preeclampsia can be identified with an ultrasound of the lungs, suggests a preliminary research published in the April issue of iAnesthesiology/i. About 60,000 women worldwide die as a result of preeclampsia, which causes severely high blood pressure. Potential complications include stroke, bleeding and excess fluid in the lungs - called pulmonary edema - which can lead to respiratory failure. The study ...

Features of Early-Stage Alzheimer's Disease can be Noticed With Variations in Eye Structure and Function

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Eye abnormalities that may help reveal features of early-stage Alzheimer's disease have been discovered by investigators at the Cedars-Sinai Regenerative Medicine Institute. Using a novel laboratory rat model of Alzheimer's disease and high-resolution imaging techniques, researchers correlated variations of the eye structure, to identify initial indicators of the disease. Alzheimer's disease is the leading cause of dementia, which is characterized by loss of memory ...

Increased Cognitive Problems Found in Children Exposed to Methamphetamine Before Birth

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Youngsters exposed to the potent illegal drug before birth had increased cognitive problems at age 7.5 years, says the only long-term, National Institutes of Health-funded study of prenatal methamphetamine exposure and child outcome. The analysis also highlights the need for early intervention to improve academic outcomes and reduce the potential for negative behaviors, as published online by iThe Journal of Pediatrics/i. The researchers studied 151 children ...

Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Response to Receptor Activity-Modifying Protein-1

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A new approach for improving the use of stem cells for improvement of infarcted heart function and damge to the arteries has been developed by, Bei Shi, Xianping Long, Ranzun Zhao, Zhijiang Liu, Dongmei Wang and Guanxue Xu, researchers at the First Affiliated Hospital of Zunyi Medical College within the Guizhou Province of China, published in the March 2013 issue of emExperimental Biology and Medicine/em. They have discovered that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) ...

Climbing Mount Everest Using a Ladder

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The Nepal government is mulling the installation of ladders on Hillary Step that will help the climbers of Mount Everest reach the peak by merely climbing a ladder. The Nepal government is mulling the installation of ladders on Hillary Step, the final rock wall which climbers have to scale to reach the summit. Expedition organisers had announced recently that extra ropes would be fixed on congested ice walls like the Hillary Step, where mountaineers ...

Stem Cells may Help Repair Nerve Damage

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A new study found how stem cells were able to repair nerve damage and restore its function in an animal model. The findings, published online today in the iJournal of Clinical Investigation/i, suggest that cell therapy of certain nerve diseases, such as multiple sclerosis, might one day be feasible.To date, treatments for damage to peripheral nerves, which are the nerves outside the brain and spinal cord, have not been very successful, often leaving patients with impaired ...

Cancer Treatments may Now be Developed Using Dog's DNA!

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Using genomic analysis to study cancer in dogs could help develop new therapies for cancer, a new study found. Pure-breed dogs, whose genetics have been standardized by hundreds of years of human intervention, provide highly predictable genetic models useful in designing clinical trials, in which specific drugs are matched to the molecular profiles of human patients, according to the study. Genetic samples from 31 dogs were analyzed in the proof-of-concept ...

US Docs Worried Over Indian Drug Quality

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In the wake of recent series of recalls of Indian manufactured drugs and bans by the Food and Drug Administration, US doctors are concerned about the quality of generic drugs imported from India. Recently, the FDA has banned the import of products from Ranbaxy Laboratories Ltd, Wockhardt Ltd and Sun Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd. Reason: Quality control problems ranging from data manipulation to sanitation. About 40 per cent of generic and over-the-counter ...

Survey Commences as Afghanistan Goes to Polls

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The new president of Afghanistan will have only sketchy information about the people, as the country goes to polls in less than three weeks' time as stated by census official. Rezai goes door-to-door in the capital Kabul, collecting answers to a survey that is the first attempt to calculate the size and makeup of Afghanistan's population since 1979. In a country of sharp ethnic divides, the census faces many challenges including a bloody Islamist insurgency, ...

Gaming App may Reduce Anxiety in Just 20 Minutes!

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Stressed individuals can now reduce anxiety by playing a science based mobile gaming app for just 25 minutes as per research.. "Millions of people suffering from psychological distress fail to seek or receive mental health services. Many evidence-based treatments are burdensome - time consuming, expensive, difficult to access and perceived as stigmatising," said lead researcher Tracy Dennis of Hunter College of The City University of New York. It is ...

Sports Doping Test Now 1000 Times More Sensitive

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Detection of performance enhancing drugs is now easy thanks to a new test, which is 1000 times more sensitive than the older tests. Doping has long been the bane of many sports, including professional cycling, swimming, athletics and others. According to the BBC, the chemists at the University of Texas in Arlington claim that the method is inexpensive and works with existing equipment, adding that if validated, the test would significantly extend the ...

Sleep Disturbances may Trigger Alzheimer's Disease

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The early stage of onset in cases of dementia and Alzheimer's may be among the people experiencing chronic sleep disturbance - either through their work, insomnia or other reasons as per research. Domenico Pratico, professor of pharmacology and microbiology/immunology in Temple's School of Medicine, who led the study, and his team looked at longitudinal studies which indicated that people who reported chronic sleep disturbances often developed Alzheimer's disease. ...

Pregnancy may Raise the Risk of Certain Bacterial Infections

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Pregnancy is associated with a greater risk of an infection with the bacteria iHaemophilus influenzae/i which may cause poor pregnancy outcomes, a new study found. iHaemophilus influenzae/i can cause illnesses that include respiratory infections. Some studies have suggested an increased risk of invasive iH influenzae/i disease during pregnancy, although these were based on a small number of cases, according to background information in the article. Sarah ...

Glomerular Disease in Childhood may be Linked to Hypertension in Adulthood

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Men suffering from glomerular disease during their childhood are more likely to suffer from hypertension during their adulthood, a new study found. Glomerular disease was defined for this study as glomerulonephritis or nephrotic syndrome (both are kidney disorders). Most children who develop glomerular disease have a favorable prognosis with complete resolution of all signs and symptoms. Yet the long-term complications of resolved childhood glomerular disease are ...

Beauty Myths Busted!

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Women admit making grooming mistakes like washing hair regularly to bring more volume to it or plucking eyebrows too close to the mirror to get a perfect shape . The study has been conducted by professional hair care website Hairtrade.com, reports femalefirst.co.uk. "We all make hair and beauty mistakes but the good news is they can easily be put right and by doing so, may even save you time and money," said a spokeswoman from Hairtrade.com. Here ...

Ultrasound may Detect Risk of Respiratory Failure in Pregnant Women

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Risk for respiratory failure in a pregnant women with preeclampsia can be identified by doctors with the help of ultrasound of the lung as per research. About 60,000 women worldwide die as a result of preeclampsia, which causes severely high blood pressure. Potential complications include stroke, bleeding and excess fluid in the lungs - called pulmonary edema - which can lead to respiratory failure. The study suggests a lung ultrasound can help doctors easily learn ...

Supplements may Not Reduce Cardiovascular Risk in the Elderly

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Dietary supplements containing omega 3 fatty acids lutein and zeaxanthin did not decrease the risk of cardiovascular disease in the elderly, a new study found. Author: The writing group for the Age-Related Eye Disease Study 2 (AREDS2) clinical trial. Background: Diet studies have suggested that increased intake of fish, a source of omega ( (and) #969;)-3 fatty acids, can reduce rates of cardiac death, death from all other causes and heart attack. ...

Acute Lung Injury Linked to Bacterial Infection

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Patients can face risk of a highly lethal acute lung injury due to bacterial infection which can throw off the equilibrium between two key proteins in the lungs, a new study found. Bacteria can alter a single amino acid in the protein RhoA, pushing its activity level well above that of Rac1 and prompting blood vessels to leak and flood thousands of tiny air sacs in the lungs, said Dr. Stephen Black, cell and molecular physiologist at the Medical College of Georgia ...

Study Finds Food Supplement Trends Differ from Country to Country

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A new study, published today in the journal in PLOS ONE, shows which plant food supplements are most popular across Europe, with consumers using them to complement their diets or to maintain health. The team of researchers from the Fundacion para la Investigacion Nutricional and the University of Surrey found that these products are taken in many different forms, including in tea, juice or by tablet. They analysed data from six European countries, collecting information ...

Research Provides New Hope for Early Detection of Stomach Cancer

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Research done at the University of Adelaide has provided new hope for the early detection of stomach cancer with the identification of four new biomarkers in the blood of human cancer patients. Stomach or gastric cancer is the fourth most common cancer in the world and the second leading cause of death due to cancer. "Stomach cancer is typically without symptoms in the early stages so most cancers are not diagnosed until the later stages, and the survival ...

Frequent Alcohol Consumption Ups Risk of Stroke Mortality

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In men, consuming alcohol more frequently increases the risk of stroke mortality, reveals research published in emActa Neurologica Scandinavica /em. Excessive consumption of alcohol is associated with a variety of different diseases. The relationship between alcohol consumption and ischaemic stroke shows a J curve pattern, which means that in people who are moderate consumers of alcohol, the risk of stroke is the lowest, while heavy consumption of alcohol ...

Spain's Wine Surplus Spills Across the World

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In deepest Spain, in their fields of vines, the winemakers at the Jesus del Perdon cooperative smiled last August: the blend of rain and sun promised a bumper grape crop. They didn't expect just how big. It vaulted Spain to the world's biggest wine producer, forcing its vintners to compete abroad in a tough market to sell off the surplus. Spain overall produced 50 million hectolitres (6.7 billion bottles) of wine in 2013, a 41 percent surge from 2012, ...

Fast Synthesis of Peptides Could Boost Drug Development

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Peptides,(small protein fragments) are promising as drugs because they can be designed for very specific functions inside living cells. Insulin and the HIV drug Fuzeon are some of the earliest successful examples, and peptide drugs are expected to become a (Dollar) 25 billion market by 2018. However, a major bottleneck has prevented peptide drugs from reaching their full potential: Manufacturing the peptides takes several weeks, making it difficult to obtain ...

After Critical Illness, Risk of Psychiatric Diagnoses and Medication Use Increases

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After hospital discharge, critically ill patients receiving mechanical ventilation had a higher prevalence of prior psychiatric diagnoses and an increased risk of a new psychiatric diagnosis and medication use. This is according to a study in the March 19 issue of iJAMA/i. With recent advances in medical care, more patients are surviving critical illness. Critically ill patients are exposed to stress, including pain, respiratory distress, and delirium, all ...

Study Examines Use of D-Dimer Levels to Exclude Lung Blood Clots

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Using a patient's age to raise the threshold for an abnormal result of a blood test used to assess patients with a suspected pulmonary embolism (blood clot in lungs) appeared to be safe and led to fewer healthy patients with the diagnosis. This is according to a study in the March 19 issue of iJAMA/i. D-dimer is a breakdown product of a blood clot, and measuring D-dimer levels is one way doctors exclude a diagnosis of pulmonary embolism (PE). Several studies ...

Neuroscientists Survey Protein Family That Helps the Brain Form Synapses

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At Stanford, bioengineers and neuroscientists are working together to solve a mystery: how does nature construct the different types of synapses that connect neurons -- the brain cells that monitor nerve impulses, control muscles and form thoughts. In a paper published in the iProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences/i, Thomas C. Sudhof, M.D., a professor of molecular and cellular physiology, and Stephen R. Quake, a professor of bioengineering, describe ...

Nanopores Control the Inner Ear's Ability to Select Sounds: Study

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The human ear is remarkably adept at tuning in to a single voice, even in a crowded room full of background noise, - a feat that has proved remarkably difficult for computers to match. A new analysis of the underlying mechanisms, conducted by researchers at MIT, has provided insights that could ultimately lead to better machine hearing, and perhaps to better hearing aids as well. Our ears' selectivity, it turns out, arises from evolution's precise tuning ...

Why Chromosome Errors are High in Women's Eggs?

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At the University of Southampton, a new study has provided scientists with a better understanding of why chromosome errors are high in women's eggs. It is estimated that up to 60 per cent of eggs are affected by errors in how their chromosomes divide, making it the leading cause of infertility. Chromosome errors also lead to conditions such as Down Syndrome and early pregnancy loss. By using state-of-the-art imaging techniques, the Southampton researchers ...

Quail and Chickens are the Sources of Infection of H7N9 Influenza Virus

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A paper published ahead of print in the emJournal of Virology/em reports that among the copious species of poultry in China, quail and chickens are the likely sources of infection of H7N9 influenza virus to humans. "Knowing the likely poultry species lets us target our interventions better to prevent human infections," says corresponding author David Suarez, of the United States Department of Agriculture. The H7N9 avian influenza virus was first ...

New 'Virtusize' App Takes Your Wardrobe Online

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Here comes an app for those who are lost in the crazy world of online shopping that lets you compare clothes in your wardrobe with similar items online - so you do not need to return online purchases owing to a poor fit! 'Virtusize' App is an online wardrobe that stores measurements of clothes. This free Swedish shopping app directly compares clothes in your wardrobe that you know fit, with similar items online. Websites that have the Virtusize ...

20-year Irn-Bru Addiction Forces Man to Undergo Quadruple Heart Bypass

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A man addicted to Irn-Bru has been consuming 8 litres of the drink a day for the past 20 years after which he had to undergo a quadruple heart bypass surgery. After returning from the hospital, Andrew McSherry, 52, managed to give up the drink but only for a brief period. He is again back with his habit. The only difference is that this time it is the sugar-free version and the quantity has come down to 4 litres a day. He almost died from heart disease in ...

High Utilization of Neuroimaging for Headaches Despite Guidelines

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For headaches, neuroimaging is frequently ordered by physicians during outpatient visits, despite guidelines that recommend against such routine procedures. Author: Brian C. Callaghan, M.D., M.S., of the University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, and colleagues. Background: Most headaches are due to benign causes, and multiple guidelines have recommended against routine neuroimaging for headaches. How the Study Was ...

Chronic Sleep Loss May Cause Physical Damage and Irreversible Loss of Brain Cells

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A new study shows disturbing evidence that chronic sleep loss may be more serious than previously thought and may even lead to irreversible physical damage to and loss of brain cells. Most people appreciate that not getting enough sleep impairs cognitive performance. For the chronically sleep-deprived such as shift workers, students, or truckers, a common strategy is simply to catch up on missed slumber on the weekends. According to common wisdom, catch up sleep ...

Cardiac Arrest in Pregnant Women More Common Than Previously Reported

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The first large US study on cardiac arrest in pregnant women suggests although cardiac arrest during childbirth is rare, it may be two times more common than previously reported. The study on the potentially deadly condition published in the April issue of iAnesthesiology/i based on data for more than 56 million births, also found that cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was often successful, and that the survival rate improved between 1998 and 2011. Maternal ...

Study Questions Survival Chances in Accepted Sepsis Treatment

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A nationwide randomized clinical trial led by experts at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine found a structured, standardized approach to diagnose and treat sepsis in its early stages did not change survival chances for people who develop this deadly condition. Their findings, available online and published in the May 1 edition of the iNew England Journal of Medicine/i, could change the way sepsis is diagnosed and treated. Each year, sepsis, the ...