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NGO Says Crimean Drug Users at Risk of Developing AIDS

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It has emerged that more than 14,000 injecting drug users in Crimea risk being cut off from life-saving treatment and services prohibited in Russia. This warning was issued by an NGO working to halt HIV spread. Most immediately at risk are about 800 Crimeans who depend on opioid substitute therapy (OST), the International HIV/AIDS Alliance said in a statement highlighting a hidden health consequence of the political crisis. People on OST receive synthetic ...

Study Reveals Standard IVF Medication Dose Less Effective in Obese Women

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A new study published in the Endocrine Society''s iJournal of Clinical Endocrinology (and) Metabolism/i (iJCEM/i) says that obese women may need a different dose of medication than normal weight women in order to successfully have their eggs harvested for in vitro fertilization (IVF). IVF is a type of assisted reproductive technology used to help women become pregnant. More than 1 percent of all infants born in the United States each year are conceived using ...

Weight-Regulating Hormones may be Impaired by Childhood Abuse

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A new study published in the Endocrine Society''s iJournal of Clinical Endocrinology (and) Metabolism/i (iJCEM/i) indicates that childhood abuse or neglect can lead to long-term hormone impairment that raises the risk of developing obesity, diabetes or other metabolic disorders in adulthood. The study examined levels of the weight-regulating hormones leptin, adiponectin and irisin in the blood of adults who endured physical, emotional or sexual abuse or neglect ...

Mechanism to Reset Body Clock Discovered

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A new mechanism that governs how body clocks react to changes in the environment has been discovered by researchers from The University of Manchester. And the discovery, which is being published in iCurrent Biology/i, could provide a solution for alleviating the detrimental effects of chronic shift work and jet-lag. The team's findings reveal that the enzyme casein kinase 1epsilon (CK1epsilon) controls how easily the body's clockwork can be adjusted ...

In Adults With Mild Symptoms, Lifestyle Interventions can Prevent Major Depression

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Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh and the University of Maryland reveal that discussions with a dietary coach to learn about healthy eating were as effective as meeting with a counselor for problem-solving in preventing major depression among older black and white adults with mild symptoms of the mood disorder. Their findings were published online recently in emPsychiatric Services/em.Depression is common and treatments often don't completely resolve ...

Cancer Outcomes are Adversely Affected by Obesity and Diabetes

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Research to be presented at the 9th European Breast Cancer Conference (EBCC-9) reveals that both obesity and diabetes have adverse effects on outcomes in breast cancer patients who receive chemotherapy as primary treatment before surgery. Although a high body mass index (BMI) is known to have a negative impact on cancer development and prognosis, until now there has been uncertainty as to whether having a high BMI had an equal effect on patients with different types ...

Cheryl Cole on Her Battle With Malaria

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Cheryl Cole has opened up about her battle with malaria only after a year she helped beat the disease at Comic Relief. The 30-year-old singer talks about her "near death" experience on Sport Relief, revealing that she had gotten so ill at one point, that she was given 24 hours to live, reports the Mirror. The former wife of footie ace Ashley Cole had caught malaria due to mosquito bites during a holiday in Tanzania in 2010, after which she ...

Five Percent of Brits Use Facebook During Sex

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A new survey finds five percent of British people admit using Facebook while having sex. According to the study conducted by condom brand Durex, 30 percent of respondents confessed that their own partner has been distracted by some smart device while having sex, and 60 percent admitted to spending more time playing with technology than being intimate with their partner, Metro.co.uk reported The study, which focuses on how technology is impacting ...

Soy Allergy

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What exactly in soybean causes the allergenic reactions? Is soy lecithin responsible for allergic reactions too? Get the answers here.

Research: School Hearing Tests Do Not Detect Noise Exposure Hearing Loss

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Researchers at Penn State College of Medicine suggest that school hearing tests cannot effectively detect adolescent high-frequency hearing loss. The Pennsylvania Department of Health mandates school-administered hearing screens for children in kindergarten to third, seventh and 11th grades. The school screenings primarily focus on low-frequency hearing loss. This is logical for young children, who are more likely to develop low-frequency hearing loss due to fluid ...

Irrespective of Age, Regular Physical Activity Reduces Breast Cancer Risk

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New research indicates that practicing sport for more than an hour day reduces the risk of contracting breast cancer. This applies to women of any age and any weight, and is also unaffected by geographical location. The research was presented to the 9th European Breast Cancer Conference (EBCC-9). Compared with the least active women, those with the highest level of physical activity reduced their risk of breast cancer by 12%, researchers say. Professor ...

Scientists Discover Genetic Clue to Irritable Bowel Syndrome

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A defined genetic defect that causes a subset of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) has been identified by researchers. Researchers found that patients with a subset of IBS have a specific genetic defect, a mutation of the SCN5A gene. This defect causes patients to have a disruption in bowel function, by affecting the Nav1.5 channel, a sodium channel in the gastrointestinal smooth muscle and pacemaker cells. Gianrico Farrugia, M.D., a study author, ...

Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder: 9/11 Linked to the two Heart Disease Culprits

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High levels of exposure to inhaled particulate matter by first responders at Ground Zero of the 9/11 attack has been linked to the risk of obstructed sleep apnea and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), both conditions that may impact cardiovascular health. The two separate studies were both presented on March 20 at the American Heart Association''s EPI/NPAM 2014 Scientific Sessions in San Francisco, California by cardiologist Mary Ann McLaughlin, MD, MPH, principal ...

That Slim and Fit Neighbour also Has Better Muscles Than You

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Some people stay slim and trim without much effort and despite eating the same high-calorie food that causes others to put on weight. As it turns out, the way the muscles of the inherently thin work may give them the edge. Daily physical activity is an inherited trait with a strong association to how fat or thin a person is. Chaitanya K. Gavini et al. previously found that aerobic capacity is a major predictor of daily physical activity level among humans and laboratory ...

Preventing Kidney Failure and Improved Access to Kidney-Related Care With Medicaid Expansion

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Lower incidences of kidney failure and smaller insurance-related gaps were found in states with broader Medicaid coverage. Those are the findings of a study appearing in an upcoming issue of the iJournal of the American Society of Nephrology/i (iJASN/i). The results point to the potential benefits of Medicaid expansion on chronic disease prevention and care. Chronic disease care is a major source of rising health care expenditures, and access to care for ...

Dialysis Initiation for Acute Kidney Injury Could be Dangerous for Frail Patients

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Evidence as to which kidney patients are likely to benefit from dialysis and why is not robust and the decision to initiate dialysis for acute kidney injury varies depending on patient factors. A new study from researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania has shown that for patients with lower creatinine concentration levels - a sign of reduced muscle mass and weakness - initiation of dialysis could actually be detrimental. The findings are ...

Localized Bacterial Infections can Turn into Sepsis

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Localized bacterial infections are always present on our skin, in our mouth, gut and other tissues, and these are common and mostly harmless. Occasionally, however, a localized infection turns into dangerous systemic disease (sepsis), and scientists have new clues as to how that happens. A study published on March 20th in iPLOS Pathogens/i shows that after intravenous injection of a million bacteria into a mouse, the resulting systemic disease is often started by only a ...

Study Shows How Genes Influence Parenting

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Genes play a key role in parenting, reveals research. A study by two Michigan State University psychologists refutes the popular theory that how adults parent their children is strictly a function of the way they were themselves parented when they were children. S. Alexandra Burt, associate professor of psychology and co-author of a study led by doctoral student Ashlea M. Klahr, said that the way we parent is not solely a function of the way we ...

New Genetic Disease in Children Identified by Joint Venture of Parents and Scientists

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A new genetic disease that causes neurologic, muscle, eye and liver problems in children has been identified by the joint efforts of scientists and parents. The discovery was unusually fast thanks to a combination of modern gene-sequencing techniques, social media and old-fashioned detective work. One important clue was that affected children cry without making tears. The new disease, called NGLY1 deficiency, is described in a paper that will be published ...

Declined Funding Hampers Kidney Research and Other Areas of Medical Study

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Funding for medical research from public and private sources is seeing an all-time low. A new iJournal of the American Society of Nephrology/i (iJASN/i) article discusses the effects of such funding constraints, with a focus on the plight of kidney research. "The scientific research investment gap continues to widen, jeopardizing potential new insights into diseases and, more importantly, new cures," said co-author Roy Zent, MD, PhD (Vanderbilt Medical Center). ...

Optical Monitoring of Cerebral Blood Flow at Bedside for Individualized Stroke Care

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The effects of positioning of head of bed (HOB) positioning on blood flow reaching the brain can now be monitored non-invasively and continuously using a new device designed by University of Pennsylvania. Most patients admitted to the hospital with an acute stroke are kept flat for at least 24 hours in an effort to increase CBF in vulnerable brain regions surrounding the damaged tissue. Researchers report in the journal iStroke/i that, while flat HOB did indeed increase ...

Happiest Stroke Caregivers are Those Who Enjoy Their Own Hobbies and Interests

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The stroke caregivers who enjoy their own hobbies and interests are happier, suggests a new research in the American Heart Association journal iStroke/i. Researchers used several questionnaires to assess well-being after one year among 399 family members caring for a loved one who survived a stroke. The caregivers were mostly women (69 percent) and married to the person they were caring for (70 percent).In a two-year follow-up, 80 of the caregivers completed ...

About 6 Percent of Colorectal Cancers are Missed in Colonoscopy

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About 6 percent of colorectal cancers are missed in Colonoscopy and are diagnosed with the cancer within next three to five years, as shown in a population-based study by researchers from Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah. These cancers may have been overlooked at the time of colonoscopy or developed rapidly during the window between colonoscopies and are therefore referred to as "missed" colorectal cancers. The three- to five-year timeframe ...

Keukenhof Opens the Dutch Tulip Fest to the Public

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The Netherlands opens its 65th edition of massive flower show at Keukenhof, the world's largest bulb garden with over seven million flowers, on Tuesday. "The park is now open for two months and we received our first coachload of visitors this morning, from Singapore," Keukenhof spokeswoman Annemarie Gerards-Adriaansens told AFP. Each year the park has a different theme, usually based on a country, and this year's theme is simply the Netherlands. "We ...

Death of 23 People Due to Unidentified Illness in Guinea

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Death of 23 people was reported in Guinea within six weeks due to a mysterious illness, and the disease is yet to be positively identified, said the health ministry on Thursday. "A feverish sickness whose first symptoms were observed on February 9 has claimed at least 23 lives, including that of the director of the Macenta district hospital and three staff, out of a total of 36 cases," said Sakoba Keita, the doctor in charge of the ministry's preventive wing. "The ...

Humans can Detect 1 Trillion Smells: Study

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A recent study finds human nose can differentiate at least one trillion different odors. For decades, scientists accepted that humans could detect only 10,000 scents, putting the sense of smell well below the capabilities of sight and hearing. "Our analysis shows that the human capacity for discriminating smells is much larger than anyone anticipated, said study co-author Leslie Vosshall, head of Rockefeller University's Laboratory of Neurogenetics. ...

Herbs and Spices Intervention Helps Adults Lower Salt Intake

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Teaching people how to flavor food with herbs and spices is considerably more effective at lowering salt intake than having them do it on their own. This is according to research presented at the American Heart Association's Epidemiology (and) Prevention/Nutrition, Physical Activity (and) Metabolism Scientific Sessions 2014. In the first phase of the study, 55 volunteers ate a low-sodium diet for four weeks. Researchers provided all foods and calorie-containing ...

Antibiotic Use in Non-EU Countries Should Stimulate Development of Action Plans

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A study, published in iThe Lancet Infectious Diseases/i journal, provides reliable data on antibiotic use in non-European Union (EU) southern and eastern European countries and newly independent states. The research, which was led by Dr Herman Goossens, of the Vaccine and Infectious Disease Institute (VAXINFECTIO) at the University of Antwerp, Belgium, is a critical first step in identifying targets for improvements in the way antibiotics are used in these ...

Choice of GP Practice Pilot Most Popular With Young Patients Moving Home

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A pilot scheme allowing patients to visit GPs outside the area they live in was most popular among younger commuters and people who had moved house but did not want to change their GP. This is according to a new report by the London School of Hygiene (and) Tropical Medicine. The Department of Health's Choice of GP pilot scheme found that while demand overall was modest, participants were generally positive about the scheme and there was little sign of major increased ...

Use Of MRI Magnetic Fields to Diagnose and Treat Balance Disorders and Dizziness

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Johns Hopkins researchers report that people with balance disorders or dizziness traceable to an inner-ear disturbance show distinctive abnormal eye movements when the affected ear is exposed to the strong pull of an MRI's magnetic field. The researchers first reported in 2011 in the journal iCurrent Biology/i that an MRI's magnetic field pushes on the inner ear fluid responsible for maintaining balance, causing subjects undergoing MRI scans to have jerky eye ...

Noninvasive, Stool-Based Screening Test Detects Colorectal Cancer

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A non-invasive, stool-based screening test detected 92% of colorectal cancer (CRC), according to a multicenter trial published online in the iNew England Journal of Medicine/i. The new test, which is not yet approved by the FDA, allows patients to collect a sample at home without the need for bowel preparation or diet restrictions. Unlike other available stool-based CRC screening tests, which rely solely on detecting occult blood in the stool, this ...

Diabetes and High Blood Pressure in Middle Age May Lead to Brain Cell Loss Later in Life

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People who develop diabetes and high blood pressure in middle age are more likely to have brain cell loss and other damage to the brain, as well as problems with memory and thinking skills, than people who never have diabetes or high blood pressure or who develop it in old age. This is according to a new study published in the March 19, 2014, online issue of iNeurology/i. Middle age was defined as age 40 to 64 and old age as age 65 and older. "Potentially, ...

Soon, Abnormal Brain Scans can Help Detect Alzheimer's

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Until now, doctors were able to find out about Alzheimer's disease through symptoms such as problems with memory or thinking, but now doctors may be able to diagnose Alzheimer's through abnormal brain scans in patients who are not exhibiting behavioral symptoms. The current symptom-based diagnosis "is really a representation of a disease process that's been happening in the body for potentially 10 to 20 years," says Maria Carrillo, vice president of medical and scientific ...

Antibodies may Cut Risk of HIV Infection

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To prevent HIV infection, what immune response should a vaccine elicit? Two studies published online bring scientists closer to answering this question by identifying previously unrecognized attributes of antibodies that appear to have reduced the risk of HIV infection in the only clinical trial to show efficacy, albeit modest, of an experimental vaccine regimen in people. Earlier analyses of the results of that trial, known as RV144, suggested that ...

Patients Enjoy Quality of Life 10 Years After Esophagectomy With Gastric Pull-Up

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Long-term survivors after esophagectomy with gastric pull-up can enjoy a satisfying meal and good quality of life. This is according to a new study from a team of researchers at the University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles. This study concluded that pessimism about the long-term quality of life after an esophagectomy on the part of treating physicians and patients is unwarranted. It is published in the iJournal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular ...

Scientists Study Gut Bacteria That Cause Sepsis in Preterm Infants

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Researchers studying intestinal bacteria in newborns have characterized the gut bacteria of premature infants who go on to develop sepsis. This is a serious and potentially life-threatening condition caused by bacteria in the bloodstream. Their findings suggest new strategies for the early detection and prevention of severe bloodstream infections. The research was funded by several components of the National Institutes of Health (NIH)-the iEunice Kennedy Shriver/i ...

Miscarriage Clues Identified in New DNA Test

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A new research shows an alternative DNA test offers clinically relevant genetic information to identify why a miscarriage may have occurred years ago. Researchers were able to identify chromosomal variants and abnormalities in nearly 50 percent of the samples. This first-of-its-kind study was conducted by researchers from Montefiore Medical Center and the Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University. The results were published in the March issue of ...

Scientists Put An End to Animal Testing for Drug Discovery

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Scientists are stepping in with a new way to test therapeutic drug candidates and determine drug safety and drug interactions - without using animals. Some countries and companies are rolling out new rules to limit animal testing in pharmaceutical products designed for people. The development of "chemosynthetic livers," which could dramatically alter how drugs are made, was presented at the 247th National Meeting (and) Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS), ...