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LittleBits Makes Electrical Engineering a Child's Play

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Thanks to Ayah Bdeir, Internet Age gadgets will now be as easy as playing LEGO bricks. The engineer behind littleBits kits that make a game of piecing together modular circuitry used a Technology, Entertainment, Design (TED) conference to debut a piece to the puzzle that lets creations talk to the Internet. "It is about allowing people to understand electronics which govern our modern lives and to let people become creators and makers," she said of her ...

Gay Marriage Ban in Michigan Struck Down by US Judge

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Since there was no 'credible' evidence that heterosexual couples made better parents, a gay marriage ban was struck in Michigan by a US federal judge on Friday.. The decision is the latest in a number of court rulings to find gay marriage bans unconstitutional. The challenge to Michigan's prohibition was brought forward by two foster mothers who argued that their children were harmed by the fact that the marriage ban prevented them from being jointly ...

Big Pay Raise for Doctors in Cuba -- To (Dollar) 64 A Month

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The official Communist Party newspaper in their Granma announced steep hike in the pay raise to Cuba's doctors to the extent of 64 dollars a month. The hike in pay from (Dollar) 25 a month was to reward health professionals for being the country's top source of hard currency export earnings. President Raul Castro last month rejected pay increases for other state workers, but said they were justified for doctors, dentists and nurses "because at the moment the ...

Australia's 'No Boundaries' Cuisine Inspires Many

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The new wave cooking in Australia has already inspired a lot of people, and now the chefs from the land of haute cuisine are finally waking up to its uninhibited charms. Drawn by a no-holds-barred culinary culture that has produced creative East-West blends, French Michelin-starred cooks have been travelling to Australia for stints at kitchens Down Under. "It made me less hung-up," said Pascal Barbot, chef at Paris's "L'Astrance" restaurant who has three ...

First Female Genital Mutilation Case to be Prosecuted in Britain

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A man from London and a doctor will be the first people to be charged for genital mutilation case in Britain. Dr. Dhanoun Dharmasena is accused of re-performing an FGM procedure on a woman who gave birth at his hospital in November 2012 following damage caused by labour. Another man, Hasan Mohamed, is accused of intentionally encouraging an offence of FGM, and of aiding, abetting, counselling or procuring Dharmasena to commit the offence. Maiden ...

Variation in Treatment Outcomes for Women With Breast Cancer

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There is a significant variation in the outcomes of treatment of women with ductal carcinoma, data from the NHS Breast Screening Programme has shown. Dr Jeremy Thomas, a consultant pathologist at the Western General Hospital, Edinburgh, UK, told the European Breast Cancer Conference today (Friday) that although the majority of women with DCIS received the correct surgery for their disease, large numbers of women were undergoing mastectomy for DCIS either as a result ...

Herbal Hair Oils for Healthy Hair

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Here are some herbal hair oils that are used for moisturizing the hair not only to prevent hair fall, or dry flaky scalp but also to keep the hair healthy and promote hair growth.

Too Much Electronic Media Harms Child Health

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Excessive use of electronic media, such as watching television, using computers and playing electronic games, can lead to poorer well-being in children, according to a new study. Using electronic media can be a sedentary behavior and sedentary behavior is associated with adverse health outcomes and may be detrimental at a very young age. The authors used data from the European Identification and Prevention of Dietary- and Lifestyle-Induced Health Effects ...

Most Employees Feel Workplace Flexibility is a Myth

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Flexible work options are out of reach for most employees and that when they are offered, arrangements are limited in size and scope, says a new study. Marcie Pitt-Catsouphes, Ph.D., Director of the Sloan Center on Aging and Work at Boston College and one of the researchers of the study, said that while large percentages of employers report that they have at least some workplace flexibility, the number of options is usually limited and they are typically not available ...

China: Most Expensive Puppy Cost (Dollar) 2.09 Million

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A Tibetan mastiff puppy was sold for a whopping 2.09 million dollars in China, thus making it the most expensive canine. A property developer paid 12 million yuan for the one-year-old golden-haired mastiff at a "luxury pet" fair in the eastern province of Zhejiang, the Sydney Morning Herald reported. The dog's breeder Zhang Gengyun said that Tibetan mastiffs have lion's blood and are top-of-the-range mastiff studs and added that another red-haired canine ...

Athletes Worry About Penis Size in Locker Room

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Penis size matters to athletes in the locker room, as they idolize teammates who have bigger penises, says a new study. Dr Christopher Morriss-Roberts, a senior lecturer at the University of Brighton said that if a teammate's member is considered too large, it arouses suspicion from others over whether it could actually be used sexually, the Independent reported. The study revealed that all of the men were inclined to look at other penises in the changing ...

Suspected Debris Images of Missing Malaysian Jet Discovered by US Satellite

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The satellite images, which might show debris of the ill-fated Malaysian Airline passenger jet, have been brought to light by a US satellite. The Australian Maritime Safety Authority general manager John Young announced the details of what had been spotted, but he didn't reveal the source behind the images. Although, the Australian authorities dodged media questions about the origin of the images, but the satellite's owners, the US company DigitalGlobe, ...

Dalai Lama Says There is No Place for Stigma Against Leprosy

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There should be no place for stigma against leprosy patients in the society, Tibetan spiritual leader Dalai Lama has said. Addressing the patients suffering from leprosy and their family members, he said: "It is very important for the people affected by leprosy to be accepted by the society as part of the human family". He said the stigma attached against the disease is worse than the disease itself. "People suffering from the disease should ...

In Patients on Anticoagulants, Cold Snare Polypectomy is Effective for Removal of Small Colorectal Polyps

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GIE: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy has published a special issue for March on colorectal cancer in recognition of National Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month. The issue includes a new study that compares cold snare polypectomy with conventional polypectomy for the removal of small colorectal polyps in anticoagulated patients. The study showed that delayed bleeding requiring hemostasis (stoppage of bleeding) occurred significantly less often after cold snare ...

New Way to Classify Gum Disease Via Genetic Signature

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A new system for classifying periodontal disease based on the genetic signature of affected tissue has been devised by researchers at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC). The new classification system, the first of its kind, may allow for earlier detection and more individualized treatment of severe periodontitis, before loss of teeth and supportive bone occurs. The findings were published recently in the online edition of the iJournal of Dental Research/i. ...

Salivary Biomarkers of Gingivitis may Help in Personalized Decision-Making

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Craig Miller of University of Kentucky, Lexington, will present research titled "Salivary Biomarkers of Gingivitis: Information Important for Personalized Decision-Making" at the 43rd Annual Meeting (and) Exhibition of the American Association for Dental Research, held in conjunction with the 38th Annual Meeting of the Canadian Association for Dental Research. Salivary biomarkers have been studied to help determine the presence, risk, and progression of periodontal ...

Research Highlights Role of Novel Pro-Resolving-Medicines in Periodontal Regeneration

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Daniel Huy Nguyen of The Forsyth Institute, Cambridge, Mass., will present research titled "Novel Pro-Resolving-Medicines in Periodontal Regeneration" at the 43rd Annual Meeting (and) Exhibition of the American Association for Dental Research, held in conjunction with the 38th Annual Meeting of the Canadian Association for Dental Research. Uncontrolled host defense mechanisms can significantly impede tissue engineering, regeneration and reconstruction of oral and ...

Safety, Efficacy and Value of Water Fluoridation in Oral Health Care

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A symposium titled "Water Fluoridation: Safety Efficacy and Value in Oral Health Care" will take place during the 43rd Annual Meeting (and) Exhibition of the American Association for Dental Research, held in conjunction with the 38th Annual Meeting of the Canadian Association for Dental Research. This symposium will be chaired by Stephen H. Abrams, Cliffcrest Dental Office, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Community water fluoridation (CWF) and other fluoride ...

Contact Lenses With Night Vision

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Night-vision contact lenses that use infrared spectrum and visible ultraviolet light may soon be possible, say researchers. Zhaohui Zhong, assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering at the University of Michigan said that they can make the entire design super-thin, the Independent reported. Zhong added that it can be stacked on a contact lens or integrated with a cell phone. Current night vision technology needs bulky ...

Secret of Multiple Insecticide Resistance in Mosquitoes Unlocked by LSTM Researchers

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The way in which unprecedented multiple resistance is generated in mosquitoes found in the rice fields of Tiassale in southern Cote d'Ivoire has been identified by researchers at LSTM. The paper, "CYP6 P450 enzymes and ACE-1 duplication produce extreme and multiple insecticide resistance in the malaria mosquito iAnopheles gambiae/i" published in iPLoS Genetics/i today, highlights the combination of stringently-replicated whole genome transcription profiling, ...

Scientists Pinpoint Genetic Evidence for Single Bacterial Cause of Sepsis

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An international team of academics has identified for the first time through genetic evidence that a single bacteria could be the cause of sepsis. The team included Professor Marco Oggioni from the University of Leicester's Department of Genetics. and The study, which has been published in the academic journal iPLOS Pathogens/i, examined the events that lead to sepsis by iStreptococcus pneumoniae/i (pneumococcus), a major human pathogen, in mice. They found ...

Major Mechanism Driving Kidney Cancer Progression Identified

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Research has shown that the shortage of oxygen, or hypoxia, created when rapidly multiplying kidney cancer cells outgrow their local blood supply can accelerate tumor growth. It can do so by causing a nuclear protein called SPOP-which normally suppresses tumor growth-to move out of the nucleus to the cytoplasm, where it has the opposite effect, promoting rapid proliferation. In the March 20, 2014, issue of the journal iCancer Cell/i, researchers ...

Research Suggests Gene Silencing Instructions are Acquired Through 'Molecular Memory' Tags on Chromatin

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The way in which acquired traits can be passed between generations in a process called epigenetic inheritance has been unlocked by scientists at Indiana University. The new work finds that cells don't know to silence some genes based on information hardwired into their DNA sequences, but recognize heritable chemical marks that are added to the genes. These chemical tags serve as a form of molecular memory, allowing cells to recognize the genes and remember to silence ...

Research Efforts Need to be Intensified to Address Challenge of Antimicrobial Resistance: Fauci

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Scientists have accepted that the threat of antimicrobial resistance will probably never be eliminated given the evolutionary ability of microbes to rapidly adapt to changing environments. Today, many factors compound the problem, including the inappropriate use of antibiotics and a dwindling supply of new medicines, leading to a global crisis of antimicrobial resistance. This crisis must be addressed with a multi-faceted approach that includes a strong base of ...

Study Probes Cognitive Function and Oral Perception in Independently-Living Octogenarians

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Kazunori Ikebe, from Osaka University, Japan, will present a research study titled "Cognitive Function and Oral Perception in Independently-living Octogenarians" at the 43rd Annual Meeting (and) Exhibition of the American Association for Dental Research (AADR), held in conjunction with the 38th Annual Meeting of the Canadian Association for Dental Research. In this study, researchers hypothesized that the decline of cognitive impairment is involved in oral perceptions ...

Diet in Tuberculosis

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Patients with tuberculosis should eat a healthy diet so that they build up their immunity to fight against tuberculosis.

Detection of Infectious Disease Biomarkers may be Enhanced by Using Shrink Wrap

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Early detection of HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, malaria and other deadly infectious diseases helps prevent their rapid spread and allows for more effective treatments. But current detection methods are cost-prohibitive in most areas of the world. Now a new nanotechnology method-employing common, everyday shrink wrap-may make highly sensitive, extremely low-cost diagnosis of infectious disease agents possible. The new technique, described in a paper published ...

Using Natural-Products Derivatives to Inhibit Oral Biofilm and Cell-Cell Communication

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Steve Kasper, SUNY College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, Albany, is to present research titled "Inhibition of Oral Biofilm and Cell-cell Communication Using Natural-products Derivatives" at the 43rd Annual Meeting (and) Exhibition of the American Association for Dental Research, held in conjunction with the 38th Annual Meeting of the Canadian Association for Dental Research. Many plant metabolites and structurally similar derivatives have been identified as ...

'OK' Celebrates 175 Years!

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Take a moment to reflect on the most popular word in English language today- OK? It will be 175 years since OK -- or, as some prefer, okay -- first appeared in print, on page two of The Boston Morning Post, then one of the most popular newspapers in the United States. "I think OK should be celebrated with parades and speeches," Allan Metcalf, an English professor in Illinois who is the world's leading authority on the history and meaning of OK, told ...

Man Admits Stealing Rembrandt Painting Worth Millions

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The Rembrandt painting worth millions which was stolen from a French museum in 1999 was recovered this week after a French man claimed responsibility for the theft. The 43-year-old from Lot-et-Garonne in southwest France told police he had stolen the Dutch master's "Child with a Soap Bubble" from a municipal museum as "a challenge" and had never earned any money from it. He handed himself in on Wednesday night on the advice of his lawyer, a day after ...

Frequent Mammograms may be Beneficial for Women

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While a three-yearly screening is appropriate for detection of breast cancer, one-third women are still at a higher risk, and may benefit from frequent mammograms, a new study found. Professor Gareth Evans, from the University of Manchester (UK), told the 9th European Breast Cancer Conference (EBCC-9) today (Friday) that identifying the degree of risk of developing breast cancer in individual women would enable healthcare professionals to target screening and preventive ...

Baghdad: The World's Worst City?

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In the 1970s, Baghdad was known as a model city in the Arab world. But now, after decades of seemingly endless conflict, it is the world's worst city. That is, at least, according to the latest survey by the Mercer consulting group, which when assessing quality of life across 239 cities, measuring factors including political stability, crime and pollution, placed Baghdad last. The Iraqi capital was lumped with Bangui in the conflict-hit Central African ...

Gene Behind Daily Memory Lapses Identified

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A link between memory lapses and the D2 receptor gene (DRD2) gene has been discovered by scientists. DRD2 has an essential function in signal transmission within the frontal lobes of the brain. Those who have a certain variant of this gene are more easily distracted and experience a significantly higher incidence of lapses due to a lack of attention. "Such short-term memory lapses are very common but some people experience them particularly ...

WHO Says China Leads the World to Curb Tuberculosis Progress

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A World Health Organization(WHO) official says China has made the biggest progress worldwide in controlling tuberculosis (TB) over the past 20 years. There is no reason that, over the next 20 years, China cannot lead the efforts to put an end to TB, Xinhua quoted Bernhard Schwartlander, WHO representative in China as saying during an event held here to mark the 19th World Tuberculosis Day, which falls Monday. China's infectious TB incidence decreased ...

New Way to Make Muscle Cells From Human Stem Cells Identified

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A novel way to make large concentrations of skeletal muscle cells and muscle progenitors from human stem cells has been discovered by University of Wisconsin-Madison scientists. The new method, described in the journal iStem Cells Translational Medicine/i, could be used to generate large numbers of muscle cells and muscle progenitors directly from human pluripotent stem cells. These stem cells, such as embryonic (ES) or induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, ...

MDR-TB is a Growing Concern, Says WHO

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Ahead of World TB Day on March 24, the World Health Organisation (WHO) has stated that multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is a growing concern because people still do not have access to standard diagnostic services and this leads to the disease being undetected. But WHO is happy to see some ray of hope with its international project which is helping 27 countries make good progress in diagnosing MDR-TB. In 2012, nearly 500,000 people suffered from MDR-TB. But ...