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Pandas Thought to be Bamboo-Loving, also Found to Have a Sweet Tooth

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It is well-known that giant pandas are continually chomping on bamboo to fulfill a voracious appetite, but they were recently found to have a sweet tooth too, new research from the Monell Center reveals. A combination of behavioral and molecular genetic studies demonstrated that the giant panda both possesses functional sweet taste receptors and also shows a strong preference for some natural sweeteners, including fructose and sucrose. "Examining an animal's taste ...

Brain Damage After Stroke can be Reduced With Cell-Saving Drugs

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Pericytes are cells that control blood flow in capillaries and these cells can be saved to reduce long-term brain damage caused by stroke, reports a new study led by scientists from UCL (University College London). Until now, many scientists believed that blood flow within the brain was solely controlled by changes in the diameter of arterioles, blood vessels that branch out from arteries into smaller capillaries. The latest research reveals that the brain's blood ...

Bone Loss Reversed in Immune Disorder by Penn Dental Medicine-NIH Team

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Frequent bacterial infections are seen in patients with leukocyte adhesion deficiency, including the severe gum disease known as periodontitis. These patients often lose their teeth early in life. New research by University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine researchers, teaming with investigators from the National Institutes of Health, has demonstrated a method of reversing this bone loss and inflammation. The work was led by Penn Dental Medicine's ...

Protein That Helps Control Common Viral Infection Identified by Researchers

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A protein has been identified by the Infectious disease specialists at the Johns Hopkins Children's Center, which regulates the body's immune response to cytomegalovirus (CMV), a common pathogen that causes lifelong infections and can lead to devastating illness in newborns and those with weakened immune systems. The protein - a cell receptor called NOD2 found in several types of immune cells - has long been known for its role in fighting off bacterial invaders ...

Supporting Recovery After Treatment for Alcoholism With Smartphone App

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A smartphone application is found to help reduce risky drinking days for patients with alcohol use disorder, compared to patients who received usual care after leaving treatment in residential program. Alcohol dependence is a lifetime psychiatric diagnosis with relapse rates similar to other chronic illnesses. Continuing care for AUDs has been associated with better outcomes, but patients leaving treatment for AUDs typically are not offered aftercare. The ...

Teenage Boys Reporting More 'Forced' Sex by Women in US

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Teenage boys and male college students are being seduced or even threatened by women into forced or coerced sex, as found in a significant study that explores sexual victimization of men in the US. A large proportion of teenage boys and college men have reported having been coerced into sex or sexual behaviour. Nearly 43 percent of high school boys and young college men reported they had an unwanted sexual experience and of those, 95 percent said a female ...

Brain's Ability to Learn from Past Mistakes Improved by a New 'Thinking Cap'

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A "thinking cap" has been created by the researchers from Vanderbilt University that can electrically stimulates the brain to increase its ability to learn from past mistakes. Two psychologists from Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee-Ph.D. candidate Robert Reinhart and assistant professor of psychology Geoffrey Woodman-designed a cap that administers a low-level current to the brain to simulate the spike of negative voltage in the medial-front cortex. ...

New Stem Cell Research on Bipolar Disorder Yields Promising Results

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First stem cell lines specific to bipolar disorder have been derived by University of Michigan Medical School, and fueled by the Heinz C. Prechter Bipolar Research Fund scientists. The team used skin from people with bipolar disorder to derive the first-ever stem cell lines specific to the condition. In a new paper in emTranslational Psychiatry/em, they report how they transformed the stem cells into neurons, similar to those found in the brain - and compared ...

Beer Marinade can Make Your Grilled Meats Safer and Healthier

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Marinating the meat in beer before grilling could reduce levels of potentially harmful substances, reveals study published in Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. I.M.P.L.V.O. Ferreira and colleagues explain that past studies have shown an association between consumption of grilled meats and a high incidence of colorectal cancer. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are substances that can form when meats are cooked at very high temperatures, like on ...

Experts Say Sanitation Crisis at Alarming Stage

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Sanitation crisis in India has reached an alarming stage, say health experts. About 400 delegates from various parts of India, along with women and people from marginalised communities, attended this convention on the Right to Sanitation where they discussed and put forward the fears they face in day-to-day life. Veermati, 25, from Bhalaswa resettlement colony in Delhi, pointed out how girls in their area skip dinner to avoid the need to use the ...

Probiotics Can Protect Pre-school Children from Infections

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New research finds that administration of probiotics reduces risk of respiratory infections in pre-schoolers; it also has a significant effect in reducing episodes and duration of a href="http:www.medindia.net/symptoms/diarrhea-symptom-evaluation.htm" target="_blank" class="vcontentshlink"diarrhea/a. Probiotics are live microorganisms (mostly bacteria) which when consumed may provide health benefits. The current study proved the beneficial effect of a strain called ...

New Drug Shows Promise in Rare Lung Cancer

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Ceritinib appears to be effective against advanced ALK-positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), find researchers. The results of a phase 1 clinical trial conducted at centers in 11 countries are reported in the March 27 iNew England Journal of Medicine/i. "Crizotinib has become a standard treatment agent for patients with advanced, ALK-rearranged NSCLC, but patients invariably develop resistance, leaving their treatment options limited," says Alice ...

New NHS Guidance: Give Free Morning-after Pills to Teenagers

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In order to check unwanted pregnancies in teenagers across England, National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (Nice) has come up with a new guideline according to which schools will have to give free morning-after pills and condoms to teenage girls, including those under the age of consent. The new guideline says free condoms, including female condoms, should be readily available to young men and women at places like schools, colleges and youth clubs. The ...

21 Dog Deaths in 18 Months, Vets Investigate Mystery Disease

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In the wake of 48 cases of dog infection and 21 deaths in the past 18 months, vets in the UK are trying to find out the reason behind the mystery. Half of the confirmed cases have been reported from around the New Forest in Hampshire. Symptoms of the disease are skin lesions on legs and chest, lethargy, loss of appetite and vomiting. Very soon, the disease attacks the kidneys. Since December 2012, 11 dogs died from the disease after they were taken on walks ...

Paracetamol Overdose Guidelines Costing NHS Millions

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Researchers claim that strict guidelines for treating paracetamol overdoses - introduced 18 months ago - are costing the NHS millions of pounds a year. The number of patients receiving hospital treatment for paracetamol poisoning in the UK each year has risen by almost 50 per cent since the guidelines were updated by the Medicines and Health Regulatory Authority, a study estimates. Researchers have assessed the impact of the MHRA decision to revise ...

Treating Cerebral Ischemia

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For treating cerebral ischemia/reperfusion, mesenchymal stem cell transplantation is a novel means and can promote angiogenesis and neurological functional recovery. Acupuncture at Conception and Governor vessels also has positive effects as a treatment for cerebral ischemia/reperfusion. Therefore, Prof. Haibo Yu and co-workers from Affiliated Shenzhen Traditional Chinese Medicine Hospital, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine in China hypothesized that electro-acupuncture ...

Strong Evidence Shown for a New Class of Antidepressant Drugs

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For the first time, scientists have shown that a chemical in the brain called galanin is involved in the risk of developing depression. And the research, undertaken by a European research team, points to a strong reason to develop drugs that modify galanin functioning as a new class of antidepressant drug. Galanin is a neuropeptide (a small protein) that was discovered and investigated over 30 years ago by various groups including the Swedish scientist ...

Life Expectancy Gains Elude Obese Teens

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Although people live longer today than they did 50 years ago, people who were overweight and obese as teenagers aren't experiencing the same gains as other segments of the population. This is according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's iJournal of Clinical Endocrinology (and) Metabolism/i (JCEM). The life expectancy of the average American born in 2011 was 78.7 years, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. ...

Human Body Could Reduce Need for Animal Drug Tests

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A new project is on the brink of revolutionizing the way we screen new drugs and toxic agents, creating surrogate human organs, coupled with insights from highly sensitive mass spectrometry technologies. ATHENA, the Advanced Tissue-engineered Human Ectypal Network Analyzer project team, is developing four human organ constructs - liver, heart, lung and kidney - that are based on a significantly miniaturized platform. Each organ component will be about the size ...

Guide Protocol for Stroke Patients

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Neurologists have debated as how to help prevent stroke patients from suffering a second stroke. Now research from UNC School of Medicine provides the first evidence for which course of treatment is truly best for patients with poor collateral blood vessel formation near the site of stroke: they should have their blood pressure lowered to normal levels. Many neurologists had suspected that blood pressure should be left high in this group of patients ...

Genetics can Explain Why Infections Trigger Rheumatoid Arthritis: Study

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How genetics could explain why different environmental exposures can trigger the onset of different forms of rheumatoid arthritis, reveals a new international study. A team at the Arthritis Research UK Centre for Genetics and Genomics at The University of Manchester, part of a large international consortium involving scientists from across 15 academic institutions, believe their findings could have important implication for the way that rheumatoid arthritis is ...

Scientists Visualize New Treatments for Retinal Blindness

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New report published online in emThe FASEB Journal/em may lead the way toward new treatments or a cure for a common cause of blindness (proliferative retinopathies). Specifically, scientists have discovered that the body's innate immune system does more than help ward off external pathogens. It also helps remove sight-robbing abnormal blood vessels, while leaving healthy cells and tissue intact. This discovery is significant as the retina is part of the central ...

Collection of Works by LS Lowry Nets 15 Million at London Sale

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At a London auction, a collection of works by LS Lowry sold for 15.2 million ( (Dollar) 25 million), with a painting of Piccadilly Circus topping the night's bidding at 5.1 million. The oil paintings belonged to Cambridge businessman and collector Tony Thompson, who died last year. The Sotheby's sale saw 13 paintings go under the hammer. "We are delighted with the results of tonight's sale, which reflect the superb quality of the works that Tony Thompson collected ...

Stall Entry of Serelaxin in US, Suggests FDA

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The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has said that heart-failure drug Serelaxin, manufactured by Swiss drug maker Novartis, should not be allowed to enter the US market. The FDA advisory panel came up with the suggestion and said the drug failed to show any improvement in the condition. Serelaxin helps in dilating blood vessels and removing pressure from the heart. The panel was critical about the data and said the trial successfully met only one of its ...

Toxic Toys and Textiles Being Removed Off Supermarket Shelves in Europe

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An ever-rising number of toxic toys and textiles are now being removed off supermarket shelves by the consumer safety squad in Europe. Products from China top the list of suspect items. Thanks to better policing, Europe's Rapid Information System (RAPEX) issued 2,364 notifications of unsafe non-food products in 2013. That was a 3.8-percent increase on the level the previous year, the European Union's Consumer Affairs Commissioner Neven Mimica ...

Doctors Record 'Higher' Blood Pressure in Patients

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A new data has revealed how doctors record blood pressure levels that are higher than those recorded by nurses. A systematic review led by the University of Exeter Medical School, and supported by the National Institute for Health Research Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care in the South West Peninsula (NIHR PenCLAHRC), has discovered that recordings taken by doctors are significantly higher (by 7/4mmHg) than when the same patients ...

Gut Microbes Support Immune Cell Production: Study

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Gut microorganisms can be helpful in acting against microorganisms and working as the first line of defense against infections.. By understanding the mechanisms responsible for maintaining and replacing immune cells, researchers hope to one day develop targeted therapies to support and boost immune function in humans. Study investigators from the Regenerative Medicine Institute at Cedars-Sinai collaborated with the Mount Sinai School of Medicine and lead institution ...

Serious Lapses of Judgment in Schumacher's Treatment, He may Never Recover

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The comatose Michael Schumacher may never recover due to serious lapses in judgement during his medical care, the chief medical officer at Formula One believes. The retired seven-time German champion has now been in a coma for 87 days since a ski accident at the French Alps during a family holiday and is undergoing treatment at a Grenoble hospital. According to News.com.au, F1 sport's chief doctor between 2005 and 2012, Gary Hartstein said that it is ...

Toxicologists Explore Infants' Exposure to Chemicals Through Breastfeeding

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At the Society of Toxicology (SOT) 53rd Annual Meeting and ToxExpo in Phoenix, Ariz, toxicologists are revealing new methods and models for estimating infants' exposure to persistent organic pollutants (POPs). Infants are exposed to a variety of chemicals throughout their development, but much remains to be learned about chemicals ingested by babies through their mothers'' breast milk. While scientists and doctors agree that breastfeeding remains the healthiest ...

Researchers Interpret the Safety of Dietary Supplements, Health Products at Toxicology Conference

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The nutritional supplement industry -makers of minerals, vitamins and other nutritional supplements- is one of the fastest growing industries in the world. In 2012, it produced more than (Dollar) 30 billion in revenue, but despite dietary supplements' widespread use, there is a lack of premarket approval in some countries and a general lack of information on the safety of these products. This scarcity of testing and information is being addressed today at the Society of ...

Resistant Gynecologic Cancers can be Treated by Targeted Cancer Therapy

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Women with gynecologic cancers carrying a iBRCA/igene can experience improvement while minimizing side effects by a new cancer drug. Gynecologic cancer cells that have a iBRCA/i mutation appear to be sensitive to veliparib, which targets an enzyme called PARP (poly ADP-ribose polymerase), according to a Phase II study being presented at the Society of Gynecologic Oncology (SGO) Annual Meeting on Women''s Cancer in Tampa, Fla., March 22-25. PARP inhibitors ...

Colombian Soldiers Now a Part of Roving Circus

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A newbie trapeze artist juggled, failed to keep his balance and fell. After all, he is just a soldier -- part of a roving Colombian circus made up of military personnel. The circus is part of efforts to ease local fears about Colombian armed forces after decades of conflict -- a brutal civil war with leftist rebels that has lasted half a century and left thousands dead. The troupe, with its blue and yellow big top, is called Circo Colombia ...

New Model Predicts Accurate Blood Glucose Levels Based on Insulin Dose and Meal Intake

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Penn State researchers have created a mathematical model that can predict with more than 90 percent accuracy the blood glucose levels of individuals with type 1 diabetes up to 30 minutes in advance of imminent changes in their levels. This gives plenty of time to take preventative action. "Many people with type 1 diabetes use continuous glucose monitors, which examine the fluid underneath the skin," said Peter Molenaar, Distinguished Professor of Human Development ...

Mechanism That Causes Nerve-cell Death in Rare Children's Disease Identified

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Researchers exploring a rare children's disease that causes a gradual loss of certain nerve cells in the cerebellum of the brain have come up with new findings that could be extended to other rare hereditary diseases with defects in DNA repair. A team of scientists, led by Stuart Lipton, M.D., Ph.D., professor and director of the Neuroscience and Aging Research Center at Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute (Sanford-Burnham), recently discovered why cerebellar ...

Experts at King's College London: UK Children Under-Dosed With Penicillin

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Millions of children are receiving penicillin prescription below the recommended dose for common infection as per research . The authors are calling for an urgent review of penicillin dosing guidelines for children - which at the time of study had not changed in over 50 years - after discovering wide variation in current prescribing practice. The research adds to growing concern about the global threat of antibiotic resistance, whereby misuse of antibiotics leads ...

Burkina Faso's Gold Rush Causes Child Miners to Pay the Penalty

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Joel, a 13 year old child miner readies the plastic lamp strapped to his forehead . He is one of hundreds of children and young people working at the Nobsin mines, about an hour's drive from Burkina Faso's capital Ouagadougou, who every day risk their lives in the search for gold in the impoverished west African nation. Child mining has become a growing problem in Burkina Faso, where 60 percent of the population is under 25. A mining boom in recent years ...

New Gadgets may Help Quieten Mumbai's Incessant Honking

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Residents of one of the world's noisiest cities have taken on a daunting challenge; hushing traffic honks by using a new app! Non-stop beeping has become the dominant soundtrack to Mumbai as clattering rickshaws, public buses, clapped-out taxis, weaving motorbikes and private cars fight for space on the traffic-clogged roads. Now two separate teams in the city have come up with devices aimed at instilling some peace: one by forcing overzealous horn-users ...

Simple Blood Test Will Tell You If Your Child Will Become Obese

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Researchers have found that a simple blood test which can read DNA, could be used to predict obesity levels in children Researchers at the Universities of Southampton, Exeter and Plymouth used the test to assess the levels of epigenetic switches in the PGC1a gene - a gene that regulates fat storage in the body. Epigenetic switches take place through a chemical change called DNA methylation which controls how genes work and is set during early life. The ...

US Supreme Court Hears Contraception Case Arguments

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Should employers provide certain contraceptives under employee health plans, even if it is contrary to their religious beliefs? That is the essence of the arguments before US Supreme court. The court's three liberal women justices took the lead in grilling lawyers during the 90-minute-long hearing on the hot button issue, a spinoff of President Barack Obama's signature health reform law. Outside, dozens of protesters from both sides of the debate gathered ...

Face Blind People may also Distinguish Shapes: Study

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Researchers say that other types of objects similar to face can now be recognized by people affected by face blindness following brain damage. . Prosopagnosia, or face blindness following brain damage renders people unable to recognise and distinguish between faces - in some cases, even those of their own family members. The finding provides fresh support for the idea that the brain mechanisms that process face images are specialised for that task. ...

Alzheimer's Spread may be Halted Thanks to Diabetes Drug

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A reduction of amyloid-beta peptides, a major element of Alzheimer's disease(AD) can be observed with the help of a pramlintide, a diabetes drug. Scientists from Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) also found that pramlintide improves learning and memory and AD patients have a lower level of amylin in blood compared to those without this disease. According to senior author Wendy Qiu, associate professor at BUSM, believes that some existing drugs for ...

Media 'Hypes' About Tracheal Regeneration: Surgeons

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Whole organ tissue engineered transplants of the human trachea done by using stem cells was earlier regarded as a breakthrough in regenerative medicine. However, two leading transplant surgeons in Belgium warn of the dangers of media attention, and urge that tracheal bioengineering be demonstrated as both effective and safe before further transplants take place. Their views are published in an Editorial in iThe Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery/i, an official ...