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Fart-producing Baked Beans to be Blamed for Global Warming!

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UK minister has warned about how fart pollution could rise due to baked beans and could be blamed for global warming. Climate change minister Lady Sandip Verma was asked by Labour peer Viscount Simon, 73, if consumption of baked beans affects the calculation of global warming by the Government as a result of the smelly emission resulting there from, Daily Star reported. Lady Verma replied that Simon did raise a very important point, which is that everyone ...

Sharp Increase of Abstention from Alcohol Noticed Among Australian Adolescents

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A sharp increase of abstention from alcohol has been noticed among the Australians adolescents aged 14-17 in the last decade. This trend has occurred broadly across a wide range of regional, socio-economic, and demographic subgroups. The trend was spotted by Dr Michael Livingston of Australia's National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre at the University of New South Wales, who analysed survey responses from more than 2500 young Australians. Livingston says there ...

Effectiveness of Tamiflu and Relenza Uncovered

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Though there is no good evidence to support claims that Tamiflu reduces admissions to hospital or complications, it is known to shorten the symptoms of influenza by half a day. This is according to the updated Cochrane evidence review, published today by The Cochrane Collaboration, the independent, global healthcare research network and iThe BMJ/i. Evidence from treatment trials confirms increased risk of suffering from nausea and vomiting. And when Tamiflu was used in ...

Kidney Disease Patients may be Affected by Anemia from Common Virus

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A virus that is present in a latent state most people may induce or exacerbate anemia in patients with kidney disease, a new study found. The findings point to a new therapeutic target for affected individuals. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients and kidney transplant recipients often develop anemia, or low levels of red blood cells. This is often because they do not produce enough erythropoietin (EPO), a hormone that is made in the kidney and stimulates production ...

Policy Recommendations for Reducing Gun-related Injuries, Deaths Offered by the ACP

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Reduction of gun related injuries and deaths in US have been recommended in a new policy paper from ACP offering nine strategies to address the societal, health care and regulatory barriers.. Principal among ACP's nine strategic imperatives is the recommendation to approach firearm safety as a public health issue so that policy decisions are based on scientific evidence. As such, ACP strongly supports universal criminal background checks to keep guns out of the ...

Diabetics With Kidney Disease may Benefit by a New Drug

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Patients with both diabetes and kidney diseases can now be health benefited by a drug called atrasentan as per a new study. The findings suggest that atrasentan may help maintain the well-being of many patients who are at high risk of experiencing serious medical problems. Individuals with type 2 diabetes have a high risk of developing additional health problems such as kidney and cardiovascular diseases. To reduce these risks, it is important to lower blood pressure ...

Genetic Clues on Drug Response Provided by Yeast

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The genetic and environmental factors related to drug reactions has been untangled by the researchers thereby bringing a step closer to predicting how a drug will effect us. Researchers at the University of British Columbia exposed 6,000 strains of yeast to 3,000 drugs. Yeast strains were modified so their response could be measured. Researchers found that the yeast cells have about 50 main ways in which they react to any drug. These 50 major response ...

Timing Critical in Establishing an Olfactory Wiring Map

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The large number of scents are easily distinguished by the human nose expressing nearly 400 odorant receptors. In mice the number of odor receptors is closer to 1000. Each olfactory neuron displays only a single type of receptor and all neurons with the same receptors are connected to the same spot, a glomerulus, in the brain. This convergence, or wiring pattern, is often described as an olfactory map. The map is important because it serves as a code book for odorants that ...

Smell 'Wiring' Sets Up Early, Then Undergoes Changes

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Mammals possess hundreds of genes which produces a different odorant receptors thereby accommodating a lifetime of scents and aromas in them. The complex and diverse olfactory system they build remains adaptable, but a new study in the journal iScience/i shows that the system's flexibility, or plasticity, has its limits. Working in mice, Brown University scientists found that the fundamental neural wiring map between the nose and the brain becomes established in a critical ...

Jalebi: World's Most Fattening Foods

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One of the favorite sweets for Indians, jalebi has topped the list of fattening food items across the globe, say sources. Huffingtonpost.com has come out with the following list of unhealthy dishes in the world: * Jalebi, India: Jalebi is a deep-fried dough that is soaked in a sugary syrup. This plain fried dough is unhealthy on its own. * Calzone, Italy: A traditional calzone uses the same amount of dough as an entire pizza-which ...

Breakthrough in Nose Implant Surgery by Swiss Team

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The first-ever operations to repair cancer-ravaged noses using tissue grown from the patient's own cartilage cells were reported to be carried out by surgeons in Switzerland. The technique involves reconstructing the so-called alar wings of the nose -- the nostrils -- after removal because of skin cancer. At present, surgeons replace the "wings" with cartilage grafts taken from the ear, nasal septum or rib, which is an additional and often painful operation ...

Fight Against Human Trafficking 'Scourge' Led by Vatican

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Setting up of a global task group to fight human trafficking was agreed on Thursday by police chiefs and clergymen from over a dozen countries, a scourge Pope Francis called a "crime against humanity". At the end of two-day conference hosted by the pontiff, London's Metropolitan police commissioner Bernard Hogan-Howe said attendees, including top cops from the FBI and Interpol, had agreed to meet regularly to fight the ravages of modern slavery. Human ...

Krakow Prays to Its Saint John Paul II in the Sanctuary Named After Him

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Busy times begin for a sanctuary named after John Paul II in southern Poland, as pilgrims flood into the site and others phone in prayers ahead of the Polish pope's canonization. "This is his main shrine, where people feel John Paul II's living presence," says Sister Elwira at the John Paul II Centre in the Lagiewniki suburb of Krakow. "Those who aren't able to make the trip call us from all over Poland and the world," she tells AFP, having already taken ...

Dutch School Tries to Stop a TV Channel Showing Bullying Footage

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A Dutch school is trying to seek court help to stop a television channel showing hidden-camera footage shot by a victim of bullying using the broadcaster's equipment. A national furore has broken out over the programme with the privacy-sensitive country divided over the ethics of secretly filming children at school. "We are going to court," Peter Smit, spokesman for Rotterdam's Einstein Lyceum high school, told AFP on Thursday. The school ...

Own Homes on Display by World's Top Architects

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The international design fair this week included the features of homes of leading world architects - with eye-catching objects such as indoor trees, red walls and stair bookcase. Among the big names in attendance were US architect Daniel Libeskind, Italy's Massimiliano Fuksas and Japan's Shigeru Ban -- winner of this year's prestigious Pritzker Prize, known as the "Nobel prize of architecture". "If I had to describe my apartment in three words they would ...

France Hauls Up Record Fake Drugs Labelled as Chinese Tea

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French customs have seized millions of counterfeit medicines that were imported from China claiming to be Aspirin, anti-diarrhoea and erectile dysfunction calling it as the biggest haul of its kind within the European Union. A total of 2.4 million pills, capsules and powdered medicine were seized at the end of February in the northern port of Le Havre in 601 boxes labelled as containing Chinese tea, customs officials said Thursday. "Some of the drugs ...

As Parkinson's Progresses, Brain Cells may be Killed by too Much Protein

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The way in which the most common genetic cause of Parkinson's disease destroys brain cells and devastates many patients worldwide may have been found by scientists. The study was partially funded by the National Institutes of Health's National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS); the results may help scientists develop new therapies. "This may be a major discovery for Parkinson's disease patients," said Ted Dawson, M.D., Ph.D., director of the ...

Mechanical Forces Affecting T-Cell Recognition and Signalling Determined by Researchers

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T-cells, the body's sentinels, patrol every corner of the body looking out for foreign threats such as bacteria and viruses. Receptor molecules on the T-cells identify invaders by recognizing their specific antigens, helping the T-cells discriminate attackers from the body's own cells. When they recognize a threat, the T-cells signal other parts of the immune system to confront the invader. These T-cells use a complex process to recognize the foreign pathogens and ...

Earliest Roots of Psychiatric Disorders Explored by Yale Researchers

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Newborns, whose mothers were exposed prenatally to any one of the environmental stressors such as trauma, illness and alcohol or drug abuse, could be susceptible to various psychiatric disorders that frequently arise later in life. However, it has been unclear how these stressors affect the cells of the developing brain prenatally and give rise to conditions such as schizophrenia, post-traumatic stress disorder, and some forms of autism and bipolar disorders. Now, ...

Simple, Top Ways to Stop Snoring

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Snoring is the audible sound generated by air vibrations in the narrow air passage of the nose, mouth, or throat. Snoring can be treated by either home remedies or snoring aids.

Mechanism That Regulates Lung Function in Disease Birt-Hogg-Dube Syndrome Found: Penn Study

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Tumor suppressor gene folliculin is essential to normal lung function in patients with Birt-Hogg-Dube syndrome, reveal researchers at Penn Medicine. The syndrome is a genetic disorder that affects the lungs, skin and kidneys. Folliculin's absence or mutated state has a cascading effect that leads to deteriorated lung integrity and an impairment of lung function, as reported in their findings in the current issue of iCell Reports/i. "We discovered that without ...

Enzyme 'Wrench': Key to Stronger, More Effective Antibiotics

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Precision and specialized tools are necessary to get a job done right, believe builders and factory workers. The same is true when you're building antibiotic compounds at the molecular level. New findings from North Carolina State University may turn an enzyme that acts as a specialized "wrench" in antibiotic assembly into a set of wrenches that will allow for greater customization. By modifying this enzyme, scientists hope to be able to design and synthesize stronger, more ...

Major Risk to the Poor With New Towns Going Up in Developing Nations

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The number of poor people at risk to natural hazards and climate change increases with satellite city projects across the developing world, reveals a study from the University of Colorado Denver. Throughout Asia, Africa and Latin America `new towns' are rapidly being built on the outskirts of major cities with the goal of relieving population pressures, according to study author Andrew Rumbach, PhD, assistant professor of planning and design at CU Denver's College ...

Transcription Factors Distinguishing Glioblastoma Stem Cells Discovered

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Activity of four transcription factors distinguishes a small proportion of glioblastoma stem cells responsible for the aggressiveness and treatment resistance of the deadly brain tumor, say researchers. The findings by a team of Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) investigators, which will be published in the April 24 issue of iCell/i and are receiving advance online release, support the importance of epigenetics - processes controlling whether or not genes ...

Scientists Discover Achilles' Heel of Influenza

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Scientists have identified that influenza virus has an Achilles heel. The study reveals that a drug that inhibits a molecule called prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) increases survival rates in mice infected with a lethal dose of the H1N1 flu virus. Senior study author Maziar Divangahi of McGill University, said drugs that specifically target PGE2 pathways have already been developed and tested in animals, so their results have excellent potential for clinical ...

Scientists Find Out How We Understand Other's Popularity

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In a new research, scientists have found out how our brains recognise popular people and responds to social status. Scientists say that though they know the brain is able to go ahead with this recognition, they do not know how the brain is able to do this. Scientists said that we follow people's popularity through the brain part which is linked to foreseeing rewards. "Being able to track other people's status in your group is incredibly important in survival ...

Lab-grown Vaginas Successfully Implanted in Patients

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Researchers have successfully grown vaginas in a laboratory and implanted them into four teenage girls. The girls in the study were born with Mayer-Rokitansky-Kuster-Hauser (MRKH) syndrome, a rare genetic condition in which the vagina and uterus are underdeveloped or absent. The girls were between 13 and 18 years old at the time of the surgeries led by Anthony Atala, M.D., director of Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center's Institute for Regenerative ...

Stress, Harsh Life Lead to Degeneration of Children's Genes: Study

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Children who grow in poor and hard conditions exhibit shorter DNA strands which is an indication of illness and ageing of DNA, revealed a study. Children as young as nine year old were affected by the extreme conditions, the research said. After a study that was conducted on 40 nine-year-old African-American boys, it was found that they had shorter telomeres compared to boys who were lucky to live in happy environment. Telomeres are DNA sequences at the ends of chromosomes. The ...