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World Leprosy Day 2015

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World Leprosy Day (WLD) is observed on the last Sunday of January each year. This year it is Sunday 25 January. The idea of WLD was conceived by the French Humanitarian, Raoul Follereau who played a major role in helping, supporting and fundraising for people affected with a href="http:www.medindia.net/patients/patientinfo/leprosy.htm" target="_blank" class="vcontentshlink" alt="Information About Leprosy" title="Information About Leprosy"leprosy/a. Follereau believed ...

Quiz on Sweating

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Is sweating a problem? What causes sweating? Sweating, is a process by which our body regulates its temperature. Sweat glands in our body release a fluid containing salt.

Marijuana Is One Of The Hot Topics In Twitter

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A recent study was conducted to describe the demographics of Twitter users indulged in marijuana-related chatter and to examine the sentiment and themes on Twitter. The findings were focussed at prevention efforts that work to target individuals who are most at risk for harms associated with marijuana use. 7000 influential marijuana-related tweets over a period of one month were randomly selected to assess the sentiment and themes. Demographics ...

Ebola: Sierra Leone Lifts Quarantines as Crisis Eases

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Sierra Leone on Friday lifted crippling nationwide restrictions on movement put in place at the height of the Ebola crisis, amid signs that the deadly epidemic is retreating. "Restrictions on movement will be eased to support economic activity. As such, there will no longer be any district or chiefdom level restrictions on movement," President Ernest Bai Koroma said in an address to the nation late Thursday. However, the World Health Organization (WHO) ...

New Genes Involved in Long-term Memory Identified

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A new research has shed light on a genome and has revealed new genes that are involved in forming long-term memories. The study conducted in c. Elegans worms at Princeton University aimed at finding ways to retain cognitive abilities during aging. Senior author Coleen Murphy, an associate professor of molecular biology and the Lewis-Sigler Institute for Integrative Genomics at Princeton University, said that the study identified more than 750 genes involved ...

European Medicines Agency Awaits Final Decision on Suspension of Drugs

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The sale of hundreds of medicines for which authorization was given on the basis of clinical studies conducted at GVK Biosciences in Hyderabad was recommended suspension by the European Medicines Agency (EMA). The French medicines agency (ANSM) carried out an inspection, which revealed data manipulations of electrocardiograms (ECGs) during the conduct of some studies of generic medicines. "These manipulations appeared to have taken place over a period ...

Positive Cases for Swine Flu Among Medical Students and Doctor

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Fifty fresh swine flu cases reported on Friday, among which three were medicos taking the overall positive cases confirmed by Institute of Preventive Medicine (IPM) to 299 for this month. The list was released by the IPM and a 19-year-old second year male MBBS student, a 25-year-old final year female MBBS student and a 40-year-old woman doctor were among those who tested positive for the H1N1 virus. The IPM tested 893 swab samples, out of which 299 ...

Lowering Blood Pressure With 'Implantable' Paperclip Size Device

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Dangerously high blood pressure has been lowered in a trial group of patients, with a paperclip size device that can be implanted in just 40 minutes. The implant, known as a 'Coupler', works by joining an artery and a vein together in the thigh, reducing resistance to blood flow and lowering blood pressure, the Independent reported. Dr. Melvin Lobo, director of Barts Blood Pressure Clinic, said that the device was "highly promising" and the Coupler ...

Smart Scarf Via Smartphone That Will Heat Up and Vibrate on Demand

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A new smart scarf to be operated via smartphone has been developed that heats up on demand and vibrates too, reported PC World. The prototype scarf, dubbed Swarm (Sensing Whether Affect Requires Mediation) by Microsoft researchers, made its debut at a Stanford University conference this week, according to MIT Technology Review and Mobi Health News, PC World reported. It consists of hexagon-shaped modules of industrial felt with conductive copper taffeta ...

Risk of Birth Defect Double With Pregnant Women Taking Painkillers

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Using doctor prescribed painkillers by women of child bearing age, face double the risk of serious birth defects in babies than their counterparts. Many women are unaware that prescription opioid-based medications such as codeine, oxycodone, hydrocodone, or morphine, used to treat severe pain, may increase the risk for birth defects of the baby's brain, spine, and heart, as well as preterm birth when taken during pregnancy. Use of these medications also can cause ...

Rosetta's Target Comet Shows More Diversity Than Expected

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The icy body shown in the results of Europe's ongoing Rosetta comet mission is believed to be a remnant from the formation of the solar system. It seems to be far more complex than scientists expected. Rosetta had revealed its host comet as having a remarkable array of surface features and with many processes contributing to its activity, painting a complex picture of its evolution. The initial results are presented from seven of Rosetta's 11 science ...

Now Wearable Nanowire Sensor to Monitor Patient's Health

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Scientists have developed a new, wearable sensor that uses silver nanowires to monitor electrophysiological signals, such as electrocardiography (EKG) or electromyography (EMG). According to the researchers from North Carolina State University, the sensor is as accurate as the 'wet electrode' sensors used in hospitals, but can be used for long-term monitoring and is more accurate than existing sensors when a patient is moving. Long-term ...

Video-based Therapy Might Help Babies at High-Risk of Autism

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A new study has found that video-based therapy for families with babies at risk of autism improves infants' engagement, attention and social behavior, and might reduce their risk chances of developing the condition. Researchers said they showed that using video feedback-based therapy to help parents understand and respond to their baby's early communication style might help modify emerging autism symptoms. Jonathan Green, a Manchester University ...

Brian Sandoval's Budget Would Boost Autism Funding in Nevada

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Gov. Brian Sandoval's new budget proposes to significantly increase funding to treat the estimated 6,000 children in Nevada diagnosed with autism. However, a wait list of about 1,000 children seeking services is expected to continue, state lawmakers were told Wednesday. Total spending on children with autism spectrum disorder would jump to (Dollar) 73 million in the new budget from about (Dollar) 10 million currently, resulting in services being provided to 836 children by ...

Type I Diabetes Prevented in Mouse Model

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Scientists have found a way to prevent type I diabetes in a mouse model, an advance that may lead to treatments that slow progression of the disease in humans. Type I diabetes is a chronic autoimmune disease that occurs when the body's immune system destroys insulin producing pancreatic beta cells. Current treatments for type I diabetes focus on controlling blood sugar with insulin therapy and must continue throughout a person's life. ...

Twitter Persuading to Use Twitter App for Photos Instead of Instagram

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Some of the most popular verified Twitter users are being persuaded by Twitter to post photos directly from the Twitter app instead of sharing photos via Instagram. According to The Verge, the company reminded its elite users to post photos from its own app in order to let their fans and followers see those photos on the web and mobile devices right in timeline view. Twitter has reportedly been working towards making the process of photo-sharing faster ...

Obesity is Bad for Heart

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New links were found between obesity and cardiovascular disease when researchers applied novel methods to detect binding of fatty acids to CD36 and their effect on internalization of oxidized LDL. The study was led by James A. Hamilton, PhD, professor of Physiology, Biophysics and Radiology at Boston University School of Medicine. Although other research groups have characterized a fatty acid binding site on CD36 and postulated CD36 to be a gatekeeper ...