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Broccoli can Help Treat Asthma, Cabbage and Brussel Sprouts can Reverse Lung Damage: Study

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A new study by Melbourne researchers has unravelled the abundant health benefits of brocolli and other cruciferous vegetables. It is already a well- known fact that green vegetables are vital for general good health. The new study findings explain how one or two cups of steamed broccoli daily could help ease respiratory inflammation and thereby treat asthma. The study has found that sulforaphane naturally present in ...

Happiness of Lisa on Birth of Her Baby Was Short Lived

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Lisa Parkisson, age 36, was at the helm of happiness when she delivered baby Zac at 2:30 a.m. on Saturday. But her happiness was short lived since she died suddenly in the postnatal unit where she took rest after her cesarean section at the Royal Oldham Hospital on Monday. Lisa's father, Robert Parkisson, was informed of the sudden death of her daughter by the hospital staff. Ms. Parkisson's partner Chris Harding said ...

Milk and Eggs Panic Parents More Than Peanuts

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Being a parent of child with food allergies, constant vigilance is needed for everything your child eats, when a single food item containing a hidden ingredient can be fatal. Although worry is a factor for anyone caring for a www.acaai.org child with food allergies, according to a study published in the July issue of iAnnals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology/i, the scientific publication of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI), there is increased ...

Monitoring Of Kidney Transplant Patients With 'Big Data' Technique

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Radical improvement of kidney transplant patients could be possible with a new data analysis technique, as found in a new research published this week in emPLOS Computational Biology/em. The research, carried out by a team comprising physicists, chemist and clinicians at the University of Leeds, provides a method for making sense out of the huge number of clues about a kidney transplant patient's prognosis contained in their blood. By applying a ...

Viral DNA and RNA Chewed Up By Mini-Antibody With Broad Antiviral Activity

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Plants and animals, including humans, can be protected against viruses with antibiotics and their derivatives. Members of this class of drugs are usually highly specific against components of a particular virus, and mutations in the virus that change these components can make them ineffective. An article published on June 26th in iPLOS Pathogens/i now reports that a mini antibody called 3D8 scFv can degrade (or chew up) viral DNA and RNA regardless of specific sequences ...

Silicone Hair Treatment

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Silicone hair treatment results in lustrous, detangled hair, provides thermal protection against heat styling techniques, and retains moisture. Silicones are water-soluble or water-insoluble.

Dormant Virus Unleashed With Fighting Parasitic Infection

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Dormant viral infection can become active again with signals from the immune system that help repel a common parasite, a new study shows. Further research is necessary to understand the clinical significance of the finding, but researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis said the study helps illustrate how complex interactions between infectious agents and the immune system have the potential to affect illness. The results appear ...

Insurance Companies and Not Doctors Make the Most Money in Health Care Business

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Those against the Obamacare rhetoric have opposed the government takeover of medicine while it is actually insurance companies which stand to gain much more than the doctors. Earlier people held insurance companies responsible for the high costs where costs were higher than public health care, including Medicare. Many good primary physicians want to retire early as they can no longer "just can't practice medicine anymore the way they want to."This was not due to ...

Shocking Truth About Electric Fish Found by Scientists

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Regulatory molecules involved in the genetic and developmental pathways that electric fish have used to convert a simple muscle into an organ capable of generating a potent electrical field has been identified by a team of researchers. The report is published in June 27, 2014 in the journal iScience/i, by a team of researchers led by Michael Sussman of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Harold Zakon of the University of Texas at Austin and Manoj Samanta of the Systemix ...

Medical Devices Clogged Up by Notorious Pathogen Forming Slimy "Streamers"

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Preventing infections of the common hospital pathogen is now better with the revelation of the mechanisms that allow bacteria to rapidly clog up medical devices, say a group of researchers from the US. In a study published today, 27 June, in the Institute of Physics and German Physical Society's emNew Journal of Physics/em, the researchers have shown that the bacteria colonizes into large groups, called biofilms, using a biological glue, and form thin, slimy, ...

New Chemical to Aid Drug Manufacture

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A new chemical has been discovered by Chemists at Queen Mary University of London to aid drug manufacturing processes, making it more environmentally-friendly and easier to scale for industry. Carbon-based molecules used in pharmaceuticals or agrochemicals can be prepared via a process called C-H activation, which requires the bonds in complex chemicals to be broken and reattached. This method can be expensive as precious metals like palladium or silver are needed ...

Salmonella's Weakness is Reliance on a Single Food Source

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Scientists have identified that iSalmonella/i relies on a single food source to remain fit in the inflamed intestine and is one of its major weakness. When these wily bugs can't access this nutrient, they become 1,000 times less effective at sustaining disease than when they're fully nourished. The research suggests that blocking activation of one of five genes that transport the nutrient to iSalmonella/i cells could be a new strategy to fight ...

Risk of Non-hereditary Breast Cancer Predicted With New Test

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Prediction of likelihood of a woman developing breast cancer could be possible with the development of a simple blood test, even in the absence of a high-risk BRCA1 gene mutation, reveals a research published in the open access journal iGenome Medicine/i. Researchers from UCL (University College London) identified an epigenetic signature in the blood of women predisposed for breast cancer owing to an inherited genetic mutation of the BRCA1 gene. Epigenetic ...

Tinnitus Patients Undergo Different Emotional Processing Systems In Brain

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People suffering from tinnitus, a condition of persistent ringing in the ears, process emotions differently from those with normal hearing, as per researchers. Patients afflicted with tinnitus constantly hear noises that are not actually present. These illusory noises are not speech, but rather whooshing noises, train whistles, cricket noises or whines. The severity of noises differs from one day to another. In US alone, ...

ALS Symptoms Exacerbated by Over-Activity of Enzyme HDAC6

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Over-activity of the enzyme HDAC6 in the nerve ends exacerbates the symptoms of the neurogenerative condition Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS-Lou Gehrig's disease), demonstrated in fruit-flies by scientists at VIB and KY Leuven. Inhibition of this enzyme could offer a protective effect against ALS. Patrik Verstreken (VIB/KU Leuven): "Nobody wants to suffer from a degenerative condition such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), in which you lose coordination ...

Vascular Health in Indigenous Australians Improved by Treating Gum Disease: Study

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The thickness of the wall of the arteries, a risk factor for heart disease, can be reduced with a simple non-surgical gum disease treatment, reveals a study, first of its kind among Aboriginal Australians. The study findings may be of particular importance to Aboriginal Australians, who in general have poorer oral health and higher rates of cardiovascular disease. Published in the latest issue of iHypertension/i, the study reports a significant decline ...

Sex Education In Schools Should Be Banned - Union Minister Harsh Vardhan

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Union Health Minister Harsh Vardhan has advocated a ban on sex education in schools on his personal website drharshvardhan.com. This is the second time that the minister generates a controversy on the sensitive topic of sexuality in India. Earlier, the minister had set in a heated argument by commenting to New York Times that to prevent AIDS, fidelity should be encouraged more than emphasizing the use of condoms. The doctor-turned-politician, ...

New Pathogenic and Protective Microbes Associated With Severe Diarrhea Discovered

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Microorganisms that may trigger diarrheal disease and others that may protect against it have been discovered by scientists. These microbes were not widely linked to the condition previously. "We were able to identify interactions between microbiota that were not previously observed, and we think that some of those interactions may actually help prevent the onset of severe diarrhea," says O. Colin Stine, a professor of epidemiology and public health at the ...

Blinding Disease in Premature Babies Caught by Telemedicine

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Screening for the potentially blinding disease known as retinopathy of prematurity is effective with telemedicine, found in a study funded by the National Eye Institute. The investigators say that the approach, if adopted broadly, could help ease the strain on hospitals with limited access to ophthalmologists and lead to better care for infants in underserved areas of the country. NEI is a part of the National Institutes of Health. The telemedicine strategy consisted ...

Researchers Discover New Way for Organic Reactions in Water

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At McGill University, Green-chemistry researchers have discovered a way to use water as a solvent in one of the reactions most widely used to synthesize chemical products and pharmaceuticals. The findings, published June 26 in iNature Communications/i, mark a potential milestone in efforts to develop organic reactions in water. Chao-Jun Li and Feng Zhou of McGill's Department of Chemistry report that they have discovered a catalytic system which ...

Men Hold 8 Out of 10 'Top Positions' in US: Facebook

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Facebook revealed its diversity report which shows that nearly seventy-seven percent of top positions are held by men. The report revealed that Facebook's workforce is 69 percent male and 31 percent female. In the US, employee base consist of 57 percent white, 34 percent Asian, 4 percent Hispanic people, and only 2 percent Black employees, The Verge reported. Facebook's Maxine Williams said that diversity is essential to achieving their mission, and ...

Greenland Ice Sheet Collapse Linked to Raising Global Sea Levels 400,000 Years Ago

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A warming period more than 400,000 years ago pushed the Greenland ice sheet past its stability threshold; resulting in a nearly complete deglaciation of southern Greenland and raising global sea levels some 4-6 meters, suggest researchers. The study is one of the first to zero in on how the vast Greenland ice sheet responded to warmer temperatures during that period, which were caused by changes in the Earth's orbit around the sun. Anders Carlson, an ...

South Korea's Samsung, LG Launch Smartwatches With New Google Software

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South Korea's LG and Samsung launched rival smartwatches powered by Google's new software as they jostle to lead an increasingly competitive market for wearable devices seen as the mobile industry's next growth booster. Samsung's "Gear Live" and LG's "G Watch" -- both powered by Android Wear -- are the first devices to adopt the new Google software specifically designed for wearables. G Watch -- LG's first smartwatch -- is also equipped with Google's ...

Abandoned Children Fear as US Military Eye Philippines

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More than two decades ago, when the last US ship pulled out of the Philippines' Subic naval base, a desperate young woman's hopes of finding her father sailed away with it. Beirut Calaguas, now 44, is among the tens of thousands of "Amerasians" fathered by US soldiers who served in the Philippines, home to the US military's biggest overseas bases until they closed down in 1992. Like so many others, Calaguas has endured a life of discrimination and poverty, ...

Paid Holidays for Chinese Political Activist

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Veteran Chinese political activist He Depu was obliged to leave town -- for an all-expenses-paid holiday to the tropical island of Hainan, complete with police escorts, as top Communist leaders gathered in Beijing. It is an unusual method of muzzling dissent, but He is one of dozens of campaigners who rights groups say have been forced on vacation -- sometimes featuring luxurious hotels beside sun-drenched beaches, trips to tourist sites and lavish dinners -- courtesy ...

Patients Who Receive Home Nutritional Care may Need to Have Emergency Plans

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Researchers are now calling for home parenteral and enteral nutrition consumers to have a comprehensive emergency preparedness plan to ensure that the needs are met during the time of a disaster. In a paper published today in the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition's (A.S.P.E.N.) emNutrition in Clinical Practice/em journal, researchers with Coram Specialty Infusion Services outline the experiences of HPEN consumers and homecare providers in ...

Use of Low-dose Aspirin may Reduce Pancreatic Cancer Risk

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The use of low dose aspirin may actually help an individual reduce his risk of developing pancreatic cancer, a new study has found. "We found that the use of low-dose aspirin was associated with cutting the risk of pancreatic cancer in half, with some evidence that the longer low-dose aspirin was used, the lower the risk," said Harvey A. Risch, MD, PhD, professor of epidemiology in the Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology at the Yale School of Public Health ...

Current IV Feeding Needs Revisions to Safeguard Patients Against Bloodstream Infections

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A new study has found that the current guidelines that are designed to prevent infections of the bloodstream during IV feeding may actually need revisions. Researchers at the United Kingdom's University of Southampton found that current guidelines do not account for other independent factors that can affect the growth of potentially deadly microorganisms. Their study was published today in the OnlineFirst version of the emJournal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition ...

Women Use More Mental Health Services Than Men

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Women with chronic physical illnesses are more likely to use mental health services than men with similar illnesses; they also look for mental health services 6 months earlier than those same men. This is according to new study from St. Michael's Hospital and the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences (ICES). "Chronic physical illness can lead to depression," said Dr. Flora Matheson, a scientist in the hospital's Centre for Research on Inner City ...

Single Antibody Protects Against Hendra and Nipah Virus

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A monoclonal antibody that was known to be effective against the fatal Hendra virus is now known to protect against the closely related Nipah virus too -- the basis of the 2011 movie "Contagion" -- a highly infectious and deadly agent that results in acute respiratory distress syndrome and encephalitis, person-to-person transmission, and greater than 90 percent case fatality rates among humans. The results of the study, conducted by a team of Federal and university scientists, ...

New Method of Penetrating Cells Without Damaging Them

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The 'Trojan horse' method of delivering proteins into live human cells without damaging them has now been discovered by a team of scientists The finding, published in this month's emNature Methods/em, is expected to be easily adopted for use in medical research to find cures and treatments for a wide range of diseases, according to the team's lead scientist, Dr. Jean-Philippe Pellois, an associate professor of biochemistry at Texas A (and) M University. "This ...

Estrogen Receptor (and) #946; Limits Tumor Cell Growth and Indicates Outcome

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At some point in their lives, millions of women will develop breast cancer. While many women will completely recover from this cancer, others will not respond to treatment, and predicting which women will not respond to treatment is currently difficult. Breast cancer cells divide rapidly, and treatments that can restrict their growth are of great interest. In a June 24th study in the iJournal of Clinical Investigation/i, Rong Li and colleagues at ...

E-surveillance Program may Help Detect Gaps in Outpatient Settings

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A new framework to identify and deal with potential gaps in outpatient settings using electronic clinical surveillance tools has been developed to improve patient safety, a new study has found. The Kaiser Permanente Southern California Outpatient Safety Net Program (OSNP) leverages the power of electronic health records as well as a proactive clinical culture to scan for potential quality improvement opportunities and intervene to improve patient care. The ...

Obesity Prior to Pregnancy Linked to Preterm Births

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Women who are obese before they become pregnant may have an increased risk of delivering a premature baby, researchers have found. The findings from the Stanford University School of Medicine provide important clues as to what triggers extremely preterm births, specifically those that occur prior to 28 weeks of pregnancy. The study found no link between maternal obesity and premature births that happen between 28 and 37 weeks of the normal 40-week gestation ...

New Study Finds Alcohol Use Increases Over Generation

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A study of mothers and daughters has revealed that drinking alcohol has increased over a generation. Previous research suggests drinking patterns have changed with more heavy drinking at younger ages. The authors compared change in alcohol use over a generation of young women born in Australia born from 1981 to 1983 with that of their mothers at the same age. Data from an Australian birth cohort study were used for the two generations of women. The ...

New Therapeutic Vaccine Against Brain Cancer Demonstrates Positive Results

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Oligodendrogliomas and Astrocytomas are subtypes of a brain cancer called 'glioma'. These incurable brain tumors arise from glial cells, a type of support cell found in the central nervous system. "Low-grade gliomas", which grow comparatively slowly, spread in a diffuse manner across the brain and are very difficult to completely eliminate through surgery. In many cases, the effectiveness of treatments with chemotherapy and radiotherapy is very limited. Gliomas can develop ...

Reduced Toxicity of New HIV Drugs may Help Improve Life Expectancy

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A new study has found that bringing new drugs to deal with HIV in younger individuals is required, but lowering the toxicity of those drugs is even more important. The research, supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF) and National Institutes of Health (NIH), and published June 25 in the journal iPLOS ONE/i, used a computer simulation to examine what would happen if guidelines for starting HIV treatment took into account the rate of new drug development and the ...

New Biomarker Predicts Febrile Seizure-Related Epilepsy

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UC Irvine researchers claim that a newly discovered biomarker - visible in brain scans for hours after febrile seizures - predicts which individuals will subsequently develop epilepsy. This diagnostic ability could lead to improved use of preventive therapies for the disorder. A team led by Dr. Tallie Z. Baram found that rats exhibiting this novel signal in magnetic resonance imaging scans of their brains manifested symptoms of epilepsy months after experiencing ...

Use of Regional Anesthesia During Hip Fracture Surgery Not Associated With Lower Risk of Death

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Every year, more than 300,000 hip fractures occur in the United States, which can lead to functional disability and death. Among more than 56,000 adults undergoing hip repair between 2004 and 2011, the use of regional anesthesia compared with general anesthesia was not associated with a lower risk of death at 30 days, but was associated with a modestly shorter length of hospital stay, according to a study in the June 25 issue of iJAMA/i. Regional ...

Women Who Become First Time Mothers Late in Their Lives Live to a Very Old Age

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A new study reveals that women who give birth to their first child late in their lives are more likely to live to an unusually old age. In the nested case-control study, which used Long Life Family Study data, 311 women who survived past the oldest fifth percentile of survival (according to birth cohort-matched life tables) were identified as cases, along with 151 women who died at ages younger than the top fifth percentile of survival who were identified as controls. ...

Being in an Unhappy Relationship Linked With Increased Risk of Cardiovascular Disease

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Researchers led by Professor Thomas Kamarck from the University of Pittsburgh have found that being in an unhappy marriage or social relationship was linked with increased risk of health problems, including cardiovascular disease. Nataria Joseph, who recently completed a postdoctoral fellowship under Kamarck, and is the lead author of the paper, said that the findings may have wider implications. It's another bit of support for the thought that marital or serious ...

TB Infection may be Underestimated Among People Taking Corticosteroids

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New research suggests that tuberculosis infection among people taking corticosteroid pills may be underestimated. Current guidelines for what constitutes a positive TB skin test among corticosteroid pill users may not be capturing all those who are infected, said Dr. Nicholas Vozoris, a respirologist in the Tuberculosis Program at St. Michael's Hospital.Previous research has shown that people who take corticosteroid pills, such as Prednisone, and have inhaled the ...

CU-Boulder Team Develop 3-D Version of Children's Classic for Visually Impaired Kids

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Researchers at University of Colorado Boulder have developed the first 3D version of the children's classic, 'Goodnight Moon' that will help visually impaired children experience the story by touching the characters as the book is read aloud by their families. The story by Margaret Wise Brown of a bunny in bed wishing good night to his surroundings, "Goodnight Moon" was a logical first choice for CU-Boulder's Tactile Picture Books Project -- there are more than ...

Growth Hormone Therapy Linked With Mental and Behavioral Problems in Children

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While growth hormone (GH) therapy may help short children become taller, a new study has found that it also increases the chances of the children becoming more depressed and withdrawn over time compared to those of the same age and height not treated with growth hormone. The results were presented in a poster Monday, June 23 at ICE/ENDO 2014, the joint meeting of the International Society of Endocrinology and the Endocrine Society in Chicago. "Daily injections, ...

El Greco's Influence on Modern Art Celebrated by Madrid Museum

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Spanish master painter El Greco's influence on modern greats such as Francis Bacon and Jackson Pollock was celebrated through a a major show at Madrid's top art museum, the Prado, on Monday. "El Greco and Modern Painting" is part of a year-long series of big exhibitions to mark the 400th anniversary of the Greek-born master's death. El Greco's works languished in obscurity until the late 19th century, but once collectors noticed them he became one of ...

Gut Bacteria Composition Changes in Type 2 Diabetics and Obese People

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A new study conducted by Turkish researchers that has been presented at the joint meeting of the International Society of Endocrinology and the Endocrine Society: ICE/ENDO 2014 in Chicago reveals that the composition of gut microbiota was different in Type 2 diabetes patients and obese people compared to healthy people. The study lends support to other recent reports that have found an association between specific bacterial species in the human digestive system ...

MLB All-Star Pitchers Not Supportive of Expanding Instant Replays to Review Strike Zone Calls

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Majority of All-Star pitchers in Major League Baseball would be happy if reviewing strike zone calls was not included in the expanded use of instant replays that will allow umpires to review home run calls, forced plays, foul balls and more, a new study conducted by researchers at Columbia Business School reveals. "Instant replay will become public enemy no. 1 for All-Star pitchers this year," said Professor Jerry Kim, assistant professor at Columbia Business School ...

Parents of Children Excluded from Child Care Opt for Emergency or Urgent Care Visits for Their Kids

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Researchers at University of Michigan have found that a large number of parents of sick children excluded from attending child care chose urgent care or emergency department visits. The study, published today in iPediatrics/i, also found that use of the emergency department or urgent care was significantly higher among parents who are single or divorced, African American, have job concerns or needed a doctor's note for the child to return. Previous ...

Medical NGO Underlines Growing Concern Over Widespread Outbreak of Ebola Virus in West Africa

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With more than 60 outbreak hotspots spread across the region, medical NGO Doctors Without Borders (MSF) has warned that the recent outbreak of the deadly Ebola virus in West Africa is 'out of control'. "The scale of the current Ebola epidemic is unprecedented in terms of geographical distribution, people infected and deaths," MSF said in a statement. The rapid spread of the disease, which is deadly in up to 90 percent of cases, has overwhelmed aid agencies ...

Obese or Overweight Individuals More Likely to Stick to Statin Therapy

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Former smokers or obese and overweight people are more likely to stick to statin therapy, a new study published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal reveals. Almost 1 in 10 cardiovascular events can be linked to nonadherence to prescribed medication. Studies indicate that nonadherence with statin therapy can be as high as 46%. To determine whether lifestyle influences statin adherence, researchers looked at data on 11 949 people involved in the ...

Oz Researchers Develop New Test to Trace Food-Borne Illness to Source

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Researchers at University of Melbourne may have found a new way to make it easier for public health investigators to find out whether a case of food poisoning is an isolated incident or part of a larger outbreak, a new study published in the Journal of Bacteriology reveals. The study focuses on a test called multi-locus variable number tandem repeats variable analysis (MLVA). The test, which is increasingly used in the detection and investigation of foodborne ...

Research Suggests Light-Emitting Diode Treatments Outperform Traditional Lighting Methods

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Sales from greenhouse fruit and vegetable production operations in Canada still surpass (Dollar) 1.1 billion annually although outdoor growing seasons are limited. Finding more efficient methods for providing lighting in greenhouse production is a key component to support these high levels of production and increase revenues. "Light irradiance is the limiting factor for increasing production in greenhouses, when all other factors (temperature, nutrient levels, and water ...

Surgery and Prescription Medication Seen as Better Options for Losing Weight by Obese and Overweight Americans

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A new study presented at the joint meeting of the International Society of Endocrinology and the Endocrine Society: ICE/ENDO 2014 in Chicago reveals that obese and overweight Americans who undergo weight loss surgery or take prescription weight loss medications were more satisfied with their efforts than going on diet, exercise and other self-modification methods. "This finding may mean that diet and exercise alone just don't work for a lot of people," said Z. Jason ...

Underestimating Risk of Contracting HIV Linked With Disproportionately High Risk of the Virus Among Men Who Have Sex With Men

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A new study published in the journal LGBT Health suggests that men who have sex with men (MSM) were more likely to underestimate their HIV risk and thus not take pre-exposure prophylaxis drug treatment to prevent HIV infection, leading to a disproportionately high risk of acquiring HIV. Demetre Daskalakis, MD, MPH, Icahn School of Medicine at Mt. Sinai (New York, NY), Timothy Gallagher, New York University School of Medicine and Bellevue Hospital Center, and coauthors ...

Combining Liraglutide With Exercise and Diet Linked With Improved Cardiovascular Risk Factors

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Results of a new study, which involved over 3,700 overweight and obese nondiabetic adults, reveals that combining diabetes drug liraglutide with diet and exercise was linked with significant reduction in weight as well as improvement in a number of cardiovascular risk factors including high blood pressure and high cholesterol. "If these improvements continue over time, they may result in a lower risk of heart disease," said the study's principal investigator, Carel ...

Postmenopausal Women Taking Denosumab Have Low Risk of Fracture

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A new study presented at the ICE/ENDO 2014, the joint meeting of the International Society of Endocrinology and the Endocrine Society in Chicago reveals that long-term intake of denosumab in postmenopausal women suffering from osteoporosis was linked with increased bone density, low rate of fractures and a favorable benefit/risk profile. "This study provides reassurance to physicians and their patients that long-term treatment with denosumab for at least 8 years ...

Experimental Drug Found to Reduce High Blood Pressure in Diabetics and Hypertensive Patients

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An experimental drug, empagliflozin, developed for treating Type 2 diabetes has been found to lower blood pressure in diabetic and hypertensive patients, a new study presented at the joint meeting of the International Society of Endocrinology and The Endocrine Society: ICE/ENDO 2014 in Chicago reveals. This improvement in blood pressure reportedly was accompanied by a reduction in blood glucose (sugar) levels after 12 weeks of treatment with the drug, which is under ...

Low Levels of Testosterone Linked With Functional Disability in Elderly Men

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Results of a new study presented at ICE/ENDO 2014, the joint meeting of the International Society of Endocrinology and the Endocrine Society reveal that the risk of decline in physical function over the next two years is two times more among elderly men who have low levels of testosterone or other sex hormones compared to their peers with highest hormone levels. "We also found that increasing muscle weakness-possibly due to decreasing testosterone concentration ...

Long-Term Exposure to Cold can Stimulate Growth of Brown Fat

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A new study presented at the joint meeting of the International Society of Endocrinology and the Endocrine Society ICE/ENDO 2014 in Chicago reveals that long-term exposure to cold stimulates the growth of brown fat in humans, thereby improving the glucose and energy metabolism in the body. Brown fat, also known as brown adipose tissue (BAT), is a special kind of fat that burns energy and glucose to generate heat. It keeps small animals and babies warm, and animals ...

Neanderthals' Diet Included Vegetables too

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Neanderthal diet was heavy on meat, but also included plant tissues such as tubers and nuts, claimed researchers. Scientists from MIT and the University of La Laguna in Spain identified human fecal remains from El Salt, a known site of Neanderthal occupation in southern Spain that dates back 50,000 years. The researchers analysed each sample for metabolized versions of animal-derived cholesterol, as well as phytosterol, a cholesterol-like compound ...

Offensive Exodus in Pakistan Triggers Fears of Polio

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Hundreds of thousands of children are urgently being vaccinated against polio, by Pakistani health officials, arising from fears that a civilian exodus from a tribal area where the virus is rampant could spread the disease around the country. Nearly half a million people have fled a military operation against Taliban strongholds in North Waziristan, a hotspot for the crippling disease in Pakistan. Children in the tribal district have not been vaccinated ...