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Sensitive Management of Effects of Conflict of Women's Reproductive Health Required

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Sensitivity and awareness of the unique challenges of women's reproductive health needs in times of conflict is required among clinicians, suggests a new review published today (4 July) in emThe Obstetrician (and) Gynaecologist (TOG)/em. Approximately 1.5 billion people are currently living in countries affected by conflict, fragility or large-scale violence. Women and children account for approximately 75% of those displaced by conflict and roughly 20% of those ...

'Right to be Forgotten' of Google Gets 70,000 Requests

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Google has been asked by more than 70,000 people, to delete links about them under Europe's "right to be forgotten" ruling, with some of the world biggest news sites the first to be hit. The search engine has restricted access to a BBC blog posting and several British newspaper stories under a legal ruling granting people a right to be "forgotten" in search engines, it emerged on Thursday. Google said it had received 70,000 requests since it put a form ...

Hollywood Style Celebration of Batman's 75th Birthday

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A series of comic-book, video-game and other events are among the celebrations of Batman's 75th birthday, putting Gotham's famed Caped Crusader firmly back in the spotlight. July 23 is officially Batman Day, and to mark the occasion in Hollywood, Warner Bros has organized a VIP studio tour including Batmobiles, masks, capes and other souvenirs of the Dark Knight. "The world has no heroes... Batman gives you some hope and some faith," actor Danny DeVito, ...

Energy Reserves For A Power Nap

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Pre-winter months for hibernating animals are the time to accumulate enough energy reserves that can last until spring. Offspring born late in the year have much less time to achieve this. Austrian scientists have discovered that power-napping can help late-born dormice overcome these unfavourable odds. During hibernation, dormice enter into 'torpor' to save energy and water. In this state, the dormice become inactive and show a marked decrease in their metabolic ...

World Cup 2014 Football Injuries

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World Cup Football 2014 has seen its share of injuries that are part and parcel of any sport, more so, a game like football. Know some details of the common injuries seen during a football game.

Pretenders to Crown of Hot-Dog Chomper Weigh in

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Pretenders and world-record holders in America weigh in to the crown of hot-dog chomper of the year, the hugely popular annual July 4 Coney Island competition set to draw thousands. Seventeen men and 13 women are competing to see how many beef franks they can down in 10 minutes at Nathan's Hot Dog Eating Contest at the cheesy Brooklyn seaside resort on Friday. Come rain or shine -- and thunderstorms are predicted overnight -- organizers insist the contest ...

Motorhead Fan's Brain Bleeds From Headbanging

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A heavy metal fan was found to have bleeding in the brain a month after a night of headbanging at a Motorhead concert, doctors in Germany reported on Friday. Headbanging -- the up-and-down movement of the head in time to a heavy beat -- is usually seen as a harmless bit of fun. But for the unnamed 50-year-old fan, the concert was followed by constantly worsening headaches. Neurosurgeons at the Hanover Medical School found a small area of ...

'Black Pete' Ruled as Negative Stereotype by Dutch Court

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Dutch court ruled on Thursday ordering the capital's mayor to review a traditional children's festival because of "Black Pete". Black Pete, the jolly sidekick of the Dutch Saint Nicholas is a negative stereotype, an Amsterdam court ruled. "The image of Black Pete with his thick red lips, being a stupid servant, gives rise to a negative stereotyping of black people," the regional court said in a statement. The court based its decision on an investigation ...

Ban of Wine in Offices by Employers is Allowed in France

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After the French government allowed employers to ban wine from the workplace, from Thursday, the traditional Gallic "pot", a convivial office drinks party, may be a thing of past. The government had so far exempted wine and cider from the list of alcoholic drinks that employers could ban in offices. But after a decree published in the official government journal on Thursday, wine has now been added to the list of alcoholic drinks the government says ...

Spider Fears can be Dispelled in New York on July 4

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Get rid of your spider fears by getting down and personal with the venomous beasts at one of New York's top museums as it debunks Hollywood myth that they're dangerous. Arachnophobia, the excessive fear of spiders, is one of the most common animal phobias -- felt by millions of people worldwide. And yet scientists say eight-legged creatures, tarantulas and scorpions included, pose no threat to humans, keep insects at bay and may even help cure disease. ...

Philippines Urges Its Muslims to Abort Hajj Fearing Saudi MERS

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Muslim minority in the Philippines were urged on Thursday to reconsider plans to join pilgrimage to Saudi Arabia this year due to a deadly virus outbreak there. About 6,500 Filipinos who are set to join the annual Hajj pilgrimage in October are being urged to go next year instead, when the Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) is expected to be under control, health department spokesman Lyndon Lee Suy said. "We know it's a religious custom, but it ...

Study Shows How Beryllium Causes Deadly Lung Disease

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Researchers in a recent study have identified how metal beryllium triggers a deadly immune response in the lungs. In the July 3, 2014, issue of the journal emCell/em John Kappler, PhD, and his colleagues show how a genetic susceptibility to the disease creates a molecular pocket in an immune system protein, which captures beryllium ions and triggers an inflammatory response in the lungs. The findings describe for the first time an immune response that lies somewhere between ...

Genetic Link to Autism Known as CHD8 Mutation Identified

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Scientists have discovered that people with CHD8 gene mutation have a very strong likelihood that they will have autism marked by gastrointestinal disorders. In their study of 6,176 children with autism spectrum disorder, researchers found 15 had a CHD8 mutation and all these cases had similar characteristics in appearance and issues with sleep disturbance and gastrointestinal problems.Bernier and his team interviewed all 15 cases with CHD8 mutations. To confirm ...

Top 10 Foods to Build Muscle - Slide Show

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Want to build muscles to sport that much admired lean and fit look? Try these top ten foods to build muscle the natural way.

Sexting Linked to Having Sex in Middle School

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A new study published in the journal Pediatrics reveals that teens in middle school who indulge in sexting, sending sexually explicit messages, were more likely to be sexually active compared to those who do not sext. The study has been conducted by researchers at USC School of Social Work, Los Angeles Unified School District and Sentient Research who surveyed over 1,300 students between 10 and 15 years of age from the Los Angeles school district in 2012. The researchers ...

Smartphone App may Help Improve Quality of Mental Care

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Researchers at Tel Aviv University in Israel have developed a new smartphone app which promises to significantly improve the quality of care given to mentally ill patients by detecting changes in the behavioral patterns and sending the data to doctors in real time. The researchers tested the app by installing it on the smartphones of 20 patients who were suffering from bipolar, unipolar/depressive, or schizo-affective disorders while a control group of 20 healthy people ...

Shakespeare and Skin Woes

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William Shakespeare's writing has had a major influence on the literary world but a new study suggests that the Bard of Avon may be the cause behind the social stigma associated with disfiguring skin conditions. The study was conducted by dermatologists in the UK who found that some of Shakespeare's biggest works contained passages in which the characters insulted others by mentioning skin conditions or by trying to curse someone with a skin affliction. For example ...

Study Says Ocean on Titan may be as Salty as the Dead Sea

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An analysis of data sent by NASA's Cassini mission to Titan suggests that the ocean inside the Saturn's largest moon may be as salty as the Dead Sea here on Earth. The new results come from a study of gravity and topography data collected during Cassini's repeated flybys of Titan during the past 10 years. Researchers found that a relatively high density was required for Titan's ocean in order to explain the gravity data, which indicated that the ocean ...

Kangaroos' Gait Helped by Use of Tail as 'Fifth Leg'

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Along with their two front and hind legs, kangaroos often use their tail as a 'fifth leg' which helps them maintain their gait, a new study reveals. According to the study by researchers at Simon Fraser University showed that the animals move with a "pentapedal" gait, which provides new insight into the diversity of biological movement, and specific insight into why humans walk the way they do. Lead researcher Max Donelan of SFU's Locomotion Laboratory ...

Study Hopes to Discover How Magic Mushrooms Affect the Brain

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A new study published in the journal Human Brain Mapping hopes to find out how exactly does the psychedelic chemical present magic mushrooms, known as psilocybin, physically affect the brain. The study found that under psilocybin, activity in the more primitive brain network linked to emotional thinking became more pronounced, with several different areas in this network - such as the hippocampus and anterior cingulate cortex - active at the same time. This pattern ...

Family Graves in Japan is a Dying Business

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Kumiko Kano is one of a growing number in Japan who are shunning the expense and commitment of a traditional family grave. Instead of shelling out millions of yen (tens of thousands of dollars) on an elaborate tomb, which, according to religious custom must be lovingly tended by descendents, Kano and her late husband decided to be interred in a collective grave alongside thousands of others. "My husband saw his eldest brother rack up huge costs for the ...

Wooden Transport Scooter Helping DR Congo Citizens Survive Extreme Poverty

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Man-powered wooden transport scooters, called the tshukudu, have quickly become an integral feature in Goma, a city in the war-scarred region east of the Democratic Republic of Congo that has no electricity supply or access to motorized transport. A local but highly efficient tradition, the man-powered wooden scooters are everywhere on the paved highways and dusty sidestreets of Goma, holding their own with the motorcycle taxis. They're operated by a ...

Study Underlines Urgent Need to Increase Number of Agents Used in Alzheimer's Drug Development

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There is an urgent need to increase the number of new agents used in developing new Alzheimer's drugs which can be converted into successful treatments, a new study conducted by researchers at Cleveland Clinic Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health that has been published in the journal Alzheimer's Research (and) Therapy reveals. A comprehensive look at all clinical trials underway shows:ulliThere are relatively few drugs in development for Alzheimer's disease.liThe ...

Procedures Linked With Malnutrition Screening in Hospitals Should be Improved for Better Care

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A new study reveals that even though hospitals are conducting nutrition screenings on patients within 24 hours of their admission, current practices need to be improved in order to make such screenings more effective. The study, conducted by the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (A.S.P.E.N.) and published today in A.S.P.E.N's iNutrition in Clinical Practice/i journal, found that while most respondents said that screening patients for malnutrition ...

Study Suggests Prolonged Use of Stomach Feeding Tubes in Children may Increase Risk of Stomach Fistulas

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A new study has found that prolonged use of gastrostomy tubes in feeding pediatric patients with intestinal failure can lead to persistent gastrocutaneous fistulae, or the failure of the opening to close on its own, which could make surgical intervention necessary to close the gap. The causes of gastrocutaneous fistulae in pediatric patients are largely unknown, but researchers at Boston Children's Hospital looked at possible risk factors, including nutrition. Their ...

Dyslexic Adults More Likely to Report They Were Physically Abused During Their Childhood

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A joint study conducted by researchers at University of Toronto and the University of North Carolina School of Medicine has found that dyslexic adults were more likely to report that they were physical abused before they turned 18 years of age compared to those without dyslexia. Thirty-five per cent of adults with dyslexia report they were physically abused before they turned 18. In contrast, seven per cent of those without dyslexia reported that they had experienced ...

Making Nutrition Screening Mandatory in Geriatric Health Assessment can Help Detect Malnutrition Among Older Adults

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Health experts suggest that nutrition screenings should be made compulsory as part of the comprehensive geriatric analysis (CGA) as it could help identify signs of malnutrition among older adults struggling with one or more chronic health conditions. The CGA, first developed in the 1930s, is a multidimensional diagnostic process that looks at a frail elderly person's medical, psychosocial, and functional capabilities in order to develop an overall plan for treatment ...

WHO Urges Nations to Wipe Out TB by 2050

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World Health Organization has urged over 30 countries -including some of the world's richest- to recognize the continued danger of tuberculosis (TB) and try to wipe it out by 2050. Although TB is preventable and curable, a total of 155,000 people still fall ill with the disease every year in the 33 developed nations listed and 10,000 die, the WHO said. The number of recorded new cases per year in the countries concerned -- ranging from Australia to ...

Have 'Sex' To Perform Well In World Cup

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As per a new survey by website Quartz, sex could be the reason for the soccer teams powerful performances in the World Cup. Pamela Supple, who's a sex and relationship counselor from Sex Therapy Australia, explained that being intimate helps men connect and relax by letting loose a lot of "feel-good" hormones and chemicals, News.com.au reported. But it should be kept to a half-hour or an hour time period, which is apt for a sportsperson body to rejuvenate ...

Higher Quality Studies Needed to Confirm Whether Combining Aerobic and Resistance is Better in Controlling Blood Sugar Among Diabetics

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Researchers led by Lukas Schwingshackl from University of Vienna have revealed that an analysis of available studies shows that combining aerobic and resistance training was better than just one of them in controlling blood sugar and blood fat profiles among type 2 diabetics. However, there is a need for higher quality trials as removing studies with high risk of bias weakened that conclusion, a new study published in the journal Diabetologia reveals. To date, no ...

Use of Corticosteroids in Injections for Spinal Stenosis Does Not Provide Any Additional Benefits in Reducing Pain

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A new study has found that combining glucocorticoids, or corticosteroids, with the local anesthetic lidocaine in epidural injections did not provide any additional benefit in reducing pain and physical limitations among spinal stenosis patients. Glucocorticoids, also known as corticosteroids, are commonly used to treat inflammation. "Compared to injections with local anesthetic alone, injections with glucocorticoids provided these patients with minimal ...

Insect Diet may Have Resulted in Developing Big Brains of Human Ancestors

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A lean-season diet of hard-to-reach ants, slugs and other bugs may have spurred the development of bigger brains and higher-level cognitive functions in the ancestors of humans and other primates, reveals a new study. According to the study by Washington University, challenges associated with finding food have long been recognized as important in shaping evolution of the brain and cognition in primates, including humans. Amanda D. Melin said that the ...

Gene Type Confers 26 Percent Chance of Early Celiac Sign in Kids

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Nearly one quarter of kids with two copies of a high-risk variant in a specific group of genes develop an early sign of celiac disease called celiac disease autoimmunity (CDA) by age of 5. The findings are from The Environmental Determinants of Diabetes in Youth consortium, or TEDDY. The National Institutes of Health-funded study, published July 2 in the emNew England Journal of Medicine/em, also found that participants in Sweden had higher rates of celiac ...

Light Pollution Alters Reproduction Cycle in Lemurs: Study

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Light pollution can also disrupt the reproduction of light-sensitive animals, besides obscuring the stars. French scientists have shown that light pollution can override the natural reproductive cycle of some animals, making them sexually active out of season. "The natural light/dark cycle allows living organisms to time a variety of behavioural and physiological rhythms, including migration, accumulation of reserves, dormancy and reproduction" explains Thomas ...

Scorpions are Master Architects: Scientists

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Scorpion burrows have a platform on which to warm up before the evening hunt, discover Israeli scientists. The researchers, represented by Dr Amanda Adams (Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Israel), investigated the burrows of wild Large-Clawed Scorpions (iScorpio maurus palmatus/i) in the Negev Desert of Israel. After trapping the scorpions, they prepared replica casts of their burrows by filling them with molten aluminium. Once the casts had solidified, ...

Chronic Kidney Disease and Acute Kidney Injury Each a Risk of the Other

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Chronic kidney disease (CKD) and Acute kidney injury (AKI) are closely intertwined, with each disease a risk factor for developing the other and sharing other risk factors in common, as well as sharing causes for the diseases to get worse and outcomes. This was suggested by a comprehensive analysis by scientists at the National Institutes of Health and George Washington University Medical Center, Washington, D.C. Findings were published July 3 in the iNew England ...

World Cup is All About Scoring on and Off the Pitch

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World Cup is all about scoring. And that means on and off the pitch for fans celebrating each goal and romantic encounter in Brazil's party central, Rio de Janeiro. When eyes aren't fixed on football stars Neymar or Lionel Messi on giant TV screens, they wander to the tanned and lovely girls from Ipanema, immortalized in a song, or their equally welcoming male counterparts. Along the city's world famous tourist drag, Copacabana Beach, locals have been ...

New Approach for Tuberculosis Treatment

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Consumption was one of the worst known diseases of the 18th century. Thanks to medical advances, the number of deaths from this lung disease - tuberculosis - has declined significantly. Efforts to eradicate the disease in the 1950s and 1960s resulted in a wide range of new drugs entering the market. And yet 1.4 million people still continue to die each year from tuberculosis. Multidrug-resistant strains of the disease-causing pathogen are especially ...

Fish can Remember Things Even 12 Days Later

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It turns out that the aquatic creatures are smarter than we think and can recall context and associations even 12 days later, contrary to the belief that fish have a memory span of 30 seconds. According to the Canadian scientists, who studied African Cichlids, a popular aquarium species, fish demonstrate several complex behaviours, including aggression, causing the scientists to predict that they could be capable of advanced memory tasks. In the study, ...

Leading Science Journal Retracts 'Game-Changer' Stem-Cell Study

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Nature, the leading science journal is withdrawing a stem-cell study published in January that had been hailed as a "game-changer" in the quest to grow transplant tissue. The announcement on Wednesday came after mistakes were discovered in some data published in two papers, photograph captions were found to be misleading, and the work itself could not be repeated by other scientists, it said. "All co-authors of both papers have finally concluded that ...

Friends Could Influence Young Person's Decision to Drink Walk

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A person's friends are the strongest influence on their intentions to drink walk, reveals a new study. According to a QUT study, peers may be the key to stopping their mates drink walking, a risky behaviour that kills on average two Australians every week. Researcher Dr Ioni Lewis, from QUT's Centre for Accident Research and Road Safety, said that drink walking or walking while intoxicated in a public place, is linked to increased risk of injury and ...

Breast Cancer Screenings Skyrocket, but Do Patients Benefit?

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A new study has found that though the breast cancer screening costs shot up between 2001-2009, the increase did not cause earlier detection of new breast cancer cases. While the number of screening mammograms performed among Medicare patients remained stable during the same time period, the study focused on the adoption of newer imaging technologies in the Medicare population, such as digital mammography. Brigid Killelea, M.D., assistant professor of surgery, and ...

Drastic Action Planned Against Ebola Epidemic

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A drastic action is all set to be planned against the deadliest ever Ebola virus as the epidemic spreads across western Africa and new cases emerge. There have been 759 confirmed or suspected cases of the haemorrhagic fever in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone, the World Health Organisation (WHO) said on Tuesday, with 467 people dead. "This makes the ongoing Ebola outbreak the largest in terms of the number of cases and deaths as well as geographical ...

Hyperspectral Imaging may Give Insights into Wound Healing

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If doctors want to see if a wound is healing, they may have to opt for biopsy or some other invasive technique that injures an already injured person and can offer information only about a small area. But a technology called hyperspectral imaging offers doctors a noninvasive, painless way to discriminate between healthy and diseased tissue and reveal how well damaged tissue is healing over a wide area. The catch? A lack of calibration standards is impeding its use. After ...

Adults Stop Anti-rejection Drugs Following Stem-cell Transplant may Reverse Sickle Cell Disease

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A new treatment option for older, sicker patients with sickle cell disease is on the way Half of patients in a trial have safely stopped immunosuppressant medication following a modified blood stem-cell transplant for severe sickle cell disease, according to a study in the July 1 issue of the emJournal of the American Medical Association/em. The trial was conducted at the National Institutes of Health's Clinical Center in Bethesda, Maryland, by researchers from ...

Unintentional Injury or Violence the Cause of Death of 80 Percent of Deaths in 30s US Citizens

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Prevention strategies across society show a great deal of promise in preventing unintended deaths and injuries, a new report has found. According to the report, by CDC researchers from Atlanta, USA, more Americans between the ages of one and 30 die from injury than from any other cause. Every year, nearly 180 000 people in the USA die from preventable causes such as automobile crashes, drowning, firearm-related injuries, falls, assault, and drug overdoses; equivalent ...

Low Intensity Bone Marrow Transplantation Looks Promising for Adults With Sickle Cell Disease

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A new study has found that use of low intensity bone marrow transplantation method shows promising results in patients with sickle cell disease. Myeloablative (use of high-dose chemotherapy or radiation) allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT; receipt of hematopoietic stem cells "bone marrow" from another individual) is curative for children with severe sickle cell disease, but associated toxicity has made the procedure prohibitive for adults. ...

21st Century's Key Challenge: Prevention of Chronic Diseases

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Around half of all the adults in USA suffer from one chronic condition such as obesity, heart disease and diabetes, a new report on chronic diseases has found. The majority of these chronic conditions stem from a small number of risk factors that are largely preventable, including tobacco use, poor diet, and physical inactivity (both strongly associated with obesity), alcohol consumption, and uncontrolled high blood pressure. The report indicates Medicare enrollees (the ...

Examination of Neurological Outcomes for TBI Treatments

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A new study has found that neither the use of hormone erythropoietin nor maintaining higher hemoglobin concentration could improve outcome in patients with traumatic brain injury. Transfusing at higher hemoglobin concentrations was associated with a higher risk of adverse events. Patients with severe traumatic brain injury commonly develop anemia. For patients with neurological injury, anemia is a potential cause of secondary injury, which may worsen neurological ...

From Neymar to Merkel: the World Cup of Selfies

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Brazilian football star Neymar poses shirtless for a selfie with his girlfriend. Click. German forward Lukas Podolski has his arm around Chancellor Angela Merkel in a stadium locker room. Anybody armed with a smartphone seems to be taking selfies at the World Cup in Brazil, with fans and players posting their souvenirs online for all to see. Thanks to the proliferation of smartphones, millions of messages and pictures have been posted on social networks ...

Better, Efficient HIV Services may Benefit Developing Countries

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If HIV services were made more efficient and integrated better into health systems, millions of people in need of them would benefit, especially in the developing countries. According to a study published in the iBulletin of the World Health Organization/i today, scaling up HIV services can achieve substantially lower unit-costs per patient, while integrating these services with other health-care services, such as for tuberculosis, can achieve better value for ...