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Teeth Protein Promises Bone Regeneration

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Protein statherin which is found in the formation of enamel an important component of teeth plays a crucial role in bone regeneration, say Mary University of London researchers. "What is surprising and encouraging about this research is that we can now use this particular molecule to signal cells and enhance bone growth within the body," said co-author Dr Alvaro Mata from QMUL's School of Engineering and Materials Science and the Institute of Bioengineering. ...

Study Reveals One Third of Dyslexic Adults Report Being Physically Abused During Childhood

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Dyslexic adults are much more likely to report they were physically abused before they turned 18, finds new study. Thirty-five per cent of adults with dyslexia report they were physically abused before they turned 18. In contrast, seven per cent of those without dyslexia reported that they had experienced childhood physical abuse."Even after accounting for age, race, sex and other early adversities such as parental addictions, childhood physical abuse was ...

Brisk Business in Copacabana Gets a High Thanks to the World Cup!

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Rio de Janeiro's Copacabana beach has got its business booming with World Cup fans purchasing flip flops, fried chicken and coconut water! Juan de Lima, manager of the Ray e Ysarah food and drink stand, has had to hire two extra employees and extend working hours to cater to tourists all day during the South American nation's winter season. "Even though it's winter, it's as if it were New Year's Day every day," said Lima, whose stand is next to a beach ...

Cycling Gets Popular in Britain!

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Cycling was once a niche sport, but has now become extremely popular in Britain, so much so that people would rather buy a bike than a Ferrari. These "middle-aged men in lycra" or MAMILs, as the tribe has unflatteringly been dubbed, will be out in force this weekend as the Tour de France begins in the northern English country of Yorkshire, many of them wearing day-glo outfits and tight shorts. The typical MAMIL is over the age of 35 and paid enough to ...

High Blood Cholesterol Levels Linked to Breast Cancer

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A new study has found a link between high blood cholesterol levels and breast cancer. The research will be presented today at Frontiers in CardioVascular Biology (FCVB) 2014 in Barcelona, Spain. The meeting is organised by the Council on Basic Cardiovascular Science of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) in collaboration with 13 European cardiovascular science societies. Dr Rahul Potluri, founder of the ACALM Study Unit and lead author, said: "Our preliminary ...

Metabolism may Now be Linked to DNA Regulation

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A new way by which metabolism could be linked to DNA regulation, which forms the basis of our genetic code has now been discovered by a research team. The findings may have important implications for the understanding of many common diseases, including cancer. The DNA wraps around specialized proteins called histones in the cell's nucleus. Normally, histones keep the DNA tightly packaged, preventing the expression of genes and the replication of DNA, which are required ...

New Painless Atrial Fibrillation Treatment Introduced

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The first ever shockless treatment for atrial fibrillation will now be presented at Frontiers in CardioVascular Biology (FCVB) 2014 in Barcelona, Spain. The meeting is organised by the Council on Basic Cardiovascular Science of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) in collaboration with 13 European cardiovascular science societies. Dr Brian O. Bingen, first author, said: "AF is the most common cardiac arrhythmia. Symptoms range from the feeling of fish flapping ...

Quiz on Antiviral Drugs

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Antiviral drugs are a relatively newer group of drugs that are used in the treatment of viral infections. Test your knowledge on antiviral drugs by taking this quiz.

Protein Rich Diet may be Better for Weight Loss

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Boosting up the protein content in diet could help individuals lose weight better than by counting calories, a new animal research has found. There would be no competition between the appetite systems, when foods are nutritionally balanced and when one nutrient requirement is satisfied. Many foods however, are unbalanced and have a higher or lower proportion of protein to carbohydrate than the animal requires. Therefore, to obtain the right amount of ...

Unhealthy Foods and Drinks Portrayed in a Positive Light

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A new research has found that unhealthy foods and drinks which are common in kid's TV programmes, are frequently portrayed in a positive light. Statutory legislation to curb children's exposure to high sugar and fat in food/drink in TV adverts was introduced in the UK in 2007, and similar regulations have recently come on stream in Ireland. But these aren't applied to programme content, say the researchers. They assessed the frequency and type of food ...

Ecstasy Use Linked to Brain Spinal Artery Aneurysm

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Use of the street drug Ecstasy is thought to be linked to a potentially fatal rupture of the spinal cord artery, the doctors warn. Posterior spinal artery aneurysms - a blood-filled swelling of the spinal cord artery, caused by a weakening and distension of the vessel wall - are rare, with only 12 cases reported to date. But all of them caused spinal bleeding which affected the function of the spinal cord. Doctors discovered one of these aneurysms in ...

Ebola Epidemic may Last for Several Months

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Possibly the worst Ebola outbreak in history is continuing its deadly rampage through South Africa and may last for several months, the UN health agency said. Keiji Fukuda, the UN agency's assistant director-general of health security, said at the close of a regional summit of health ministers on the crisis it was "impossible to give a clear answer" on how far the epidemic could spread or when it might begin to retreat. "I certainly expect that we are ...

Many Choose to Inflict Pain on Themselves Rather Than Spend Some Time Alone

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A new study has found that many people would choose to inflict pain on themselves rather than spend 15 minutes in a room and do nothing but think. Researchers at the University of Virginia and Harvard University conducted 11 different experiments to see how people reacted to being asked to spend some time alone. Just over 200 people participated in the experiments. Some were college students, others were volunteers who ranged in age from 18-77 and were ...

Host Genetics may Play a Role in Lung Damage in Severe Tuberculosis

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Around one-third of the global population is believed to be infected by myobacterium tuberculosis, a pathogen that is known to cause TB. Most carriers control the infection and are asymptomatic, but severe forms of the disease (more common in children and immune-compromised adults, and often caused by particularly aggressive-or hypervirulent-mycobacterial strains) kill over a million people every year. An article published on July 3rd in emPLOS Pathogens/em now identifies ...

Left-handed People are Generally Born in Winter: Study

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Most of the mere populated left handed people, especially men, are born between the months October to February, finds study. The study conducted by Ulrich Tran, Stefan Stieger, and Martin Voracek comprised of two large and independent samples of nearly 13000 adults from Austria and Germany and found that overall, 7.5 percent of women and 8.8 percent of men were left-handed. Ulrich Tran, lead author of the study, said that this imbalance was caused ...

Surgical Theater's SNAP Gets FDA Nod

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Ohio-based company Surgical Theater has confirmed that it has received clearance from the US Food and Drug Administration to market its Surgical Navigation Advanced Platform (SNAP) for neurosurgical applications. SNAP combines flight simulation technology with advanced CT/MRI imaging and can be used in brain surgeries. The system can be interconnected with operating room navigation devices in order to receive advanced visualization of tools and the anatomy of the brain. ...

Corneas Grown Via Adult Stem Cells

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Researchers at Massachusetts Eye and Ear Research Institute revealed that they have been able to regrow corneas from adult stem cells, raising hopes of a cure for blindness. The researchers made use of a molecule known as ABCB5 as a marker to identify hard-to-find limbal stem cells which are present in the eye's basal limbal epithelium and help maintain and regenerate corneal tissue. The loss of these cells is the leading cause of blindness around the world. The researchers ...

FDA Issues Recall of 200 Vials of Sun Pharma's Chemo Drug

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The US Food and Drug Administration has announced that it has recalled around 200 vials of a chemotherapy drug manufactured by Indian pharma giant Sun Pharmaceuticals Industries. The drug in question is gemcitabine and the FDA revealed that it has recalled the vials as they have been manufactured at Sun Pharma's Caraco Pharmaceutical Laboratories Ltd. plant in Gujarat, which the health regulator claimed does not abide by its sterility standards and hence the vials' ...

Study Finds Preventive Placement of ICDs can Improve Survival in Patients With a Less Severe Level of Heart Failure

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A new study published in JAMA has found that preventive placement of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) in patients with a less severe level of heart failure can significantly improve the survival chances at three years compared to patients with no ICD. Although clinical trials have established the ICD as the best currently available therapy to prevent sudden cardiac death in patients with heart failure, some uncertainties remain regarding preventive ...

Combining Azithromycin With Antibiotics can Reduce Mortality Rate Among Older Adults With Pneumonia

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Combining azithromycin with other antibiotics in treating older patients hospitalized with pneumonia has been linked with significantly lower risk of death and a slightly increased risk of heart attack, a new study involving around 65,000 people and published in JAMA reveals. Pneumonia and influenza together are the eighth leading cause of death and the leading causes of infectious death in the United States. Although clinical practice guidelines recommend combination ...

High Risk of Recurrence Among Patients Hospitalized Due to Two Life-Threatening Skin Conditions

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A new study published in JAMA suggests that individuals hospitalized due to Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis have a high risk of the conditions recurring. Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) are life-threatening conditions that develop primarily as responses to drugs, and result in extensive epidermal detachment (upper layers of the skin detach from the lower layers). Recurrence has been reported in isolated ...

Cognitive Effects of Alzheimer's Disease Compounded When Combined With Cerebrovascular Disease

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Two different studies conducted by researchers from the Sanders-Brown Center on Aging at the University of Kentucky have confirmed anecdotal information on patients with both Alzheimer's disease (AD) and cerebrovascular disease (CVD). The findings of these two studies, which were recently published in iActa Neuropathologica/i and iAlzheimer's Research (and) Therapy/i, have potentially significant implications for patients with both disorders. Both ...

Study of Fruit Flies' Immunity can Help Avoid Weaker Immunity on Space Flights

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Researchers led by Deborah Kimbrell from the University of California, Davis have shed new light on how microorganisms alter fruit flies' immunity in space and in hypergravity, or increased gravity, a new study published in the journal Drosophila reveals. This study suggests that having normal gravity or hypergravity on the space station may help mitigate some of the biological problems, including weakened immune response, in organisms living in space. Since fruit ...

Study Sheds New Light on Why Not All Obese People Suffer from Diabetes

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A new study published in the journal Cell sheds new light on why not all obese people suffer from metabolic diseases such as type II diabetes. The study has linked heightened levels of a molecule called heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) to increased risk of metabolic diseases and suggests that HO-1 blockers can prove to be a promising new strategy in treating such diseases. "The results indicate that HO-1 is in fact necessary for the development of metabolic disease and call ...

Chemical Switch That can Help Stop Neuron Loss in Neurodegenerative Diseases Identified

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Researchers at Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute have identified a chemical 'switch' that shuts off the signals necessary for the production and survival of neurons in the brain. The switch, called MEF2, has been found in abundance in the brains of Alzheimer's patients and stroke victims and can be a potential therapeutic target to protect against neuronal loss in a variety of neurodegenerative diseases. "We have shown that when nitric oxide (NO)-a highly ...

Belgian Researchers Develop Safer and Cheaper Building Blocks for Future Drugs

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A chemical reaction that can be used as building blocks for development of new HIV and cancer drugs has been developed by researchers at KU Leuven, in Belgium, who say that it is economical, reliable and heavy metal-free and can yield fully functional 1,2,3-triazoles. Leveraging the compound's surprisingly stable structure, drug developers have successfully used 1,2,3-triazoles as building blocks in various anti-HIV, anti-cancer and anti-bacterial drugs. But efforts ...

Research Reveals Flower's Bellows Organ Blasts Pollen at Bird Pollinators

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Botanists have previously shown that Axinaea flowers appear in clusters of a few to more than 20 flowers, with pink, red, yellow, or orange petals that usually do not open completely. The stamens of those flowers stand out based on their contrasting colors and conspicuous, bulbous appendages. Something else about the stamens also piqued the researchers' curiosity: one or more of these stamens was almost always found missing in the flowers the researchers observed ...

Study can Help Identify Genes That Increase Risk of Psychiatric Illnesses

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A new study published in the journal Cell Stem Cell has come up with a new strategy that can shed new light on how genetic predispositions to psychiatric illnesses interact with other risk factors or environmental exposures to affect the development of the nervous system. The work takes advantage of a recently developed technology that allows skin cells from patients to be reprogrammed into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) that can then generate any cell ...

Study Rejects 'Production-Line Hypothesis' as Reason for Increased Risk of Miscarriages, Birth Defects

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A new study conducted by researchers at Washington State University has rejected a five-decade old hypothesis of why there is an increased risk of miscarriages and children with birth defects among older women. The 46-year-old "Production-Line Hypothesis" says that the first eggs produced in a female's fetal stage tend to have better connections or "crossovers" between chromosomes. The hypothesis also asserts that, as the woman ages and ovulates eggs produced later, ...

61 Injured and 27 Recovered Alive as Chennai Building Collapses

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As a building in Chennai collapsed on June 28, twenty seven people have so far been rescued alive and 61 people have been reportedly left injured. "This is the sixth day of the rescue work. Getting a bus has become a major problem for daily commuters, especially school and college students. There can be more people inside, in unknown conditions," said a local person. The structure collapsed approximately 20 kilometers away from Chennai, at Moulivakkam. ...

Setting Alight a Patient: Medical Inferno in China

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A patient is set alight after the therapist pours alcohol over him, as a treatment of illness, for some in China. So-called "fire therapy", which proponents claim can cure stress, indigestion, infertility and even cancer, has been used for hundreds of years and recently garnered a blaze of attention in Chinese media. There is no orthodox medical evidence that it is effective, a fact that matters little to one of China's most prominent fire therapists. ...

Heavy Twitter Use Found to be Harmful for Relationships

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Regular use of Twitter may have a harmful effect on marriages and romantic relationships, leading to constant conflicts between couples, a new study reveals. The study followed up on previous research which showed similar impacts for Facebook and raises questions about whether social network use in general is bad for relationships. The study appearing in the journal Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking found that "active Twitter use leads ...