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Brain Tumor Invasion Opens Up the Pathway to New Cancer Treatments

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A new study has found that the invasion of glioblastoma cells may actually hijack the cerebral blood vessels and cause damage to the protective barrier of the brain. This finding could ultimately lead to new ways to bring about the death of the tumor, as therapies may be able to reach these deadly cells at an earlier time point than was previously thought possible. This research, published in iNature Communications/i, was supported by the National Institute of Neurological ...

Obese Adults Die Younger

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Adults that are extremely obese have a higher risk of dying younger of conditions like heart disease, cancer, stroke, kidney and liver disease, a new study has found. According to the study by researchers from the National Cancer Institute (NCI), people with class III obesity (35.0-39.9 BMI) had a dramatic reduction in life expectancy compared with people of normal weight. Cari Kitahara, Ph.D., Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, said that ...

Antibiotics Seem Unnecessary After Gall Bladder Surgery, Do Not Appear to Reduce Risk of Infection

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In a study among patients who underwent gall bladder removal for acute calculous cholecystitis, lack of postoperative antibiotic treatment did not result in a greater incidence of infections. The study appears in the July 9 issue of emJAMA/em. Acute calculous cholecystitis (inflamed and enlarged gall bladder along with abdominal pain) is the third most frequent cause of emergency admissions to surgical wards. In the United States, approximately 750,000 cholecystectomies ...

Floppy Iris Syndrome

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Floppy iris syndrome is associated with a high risk of complications following cataract surgery.

Healthcare Costs can be Reduced With Big Data: Six Cases

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The quantity of clinical data can now become available for research and analytic purposes will dramatically increase with the maintenance of electronic health records. The use of electronic health record becomes widespread across the United States, due in large to the implementation of the Affordable Care Act. Additionally, experts in healthcare have become increasingly focused on clinical analytics that analyze large quantities of data for the purpose of gleaning insights ...

HPV Vaccine Does Not Increase Risk of Blood Clots, Study Confirms

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New research findings have shown that a vaccine known to protect against four strains of the human papillomavirus does not increase the risk of blood clots in women. Human papillomavirus infections can lead to cervical cancer. The findings in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) are based on 500,000 girls and women aged 10 to 44 who received the HPV vaccine between 2006 and 2013. Using data from national registries, researchers in ...

Dangers of Chobani Yogurt Mold Outbreak Exposed: Study

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Though Chobani yogurt company initially acknowledged the mold outbreak in some US containers, it may have been more dangerous than that, a scientific study revealed out on Tuesday. The yogurt company issued a voluntary recall of certain products with "best by" dates between September and October 2013 from its Idaho plant. More than 300 consumers reported bloating, diarrhea and vomiting. The company said at the time "this type of mold is unlikely ...

Post-Olympic Gambling Zone to be Created in Sochi

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Plans of opening a gambling zone in the Black Sea resort of Sochi, which was renovated at high cost to host the 2014 Winter Olympic Games, is on the wings, Deputy Prime Minister of Russia Dmitry Kozak said Tuesday. "The decision has been taken in principle. We backed a gambling zone in Sochi," Kozak was quoted by Russian news agencies as saying. Last week, the Russian parliament approved the creation of gambling zones in Sochi and on the Crimean peninsula, ...

Fighting the Threat to Health from Climate Change

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A joint office to help fight the threat to health from climate change and extreme weather will be set up, announced two UN agencies on Tuesday. Scientists have warned that floods, droughts, storms and rising seas will encourage diseases such as malaria, dengue and cholera, as well as heat sickness, homelessness and hunger. The new unit set up by the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) and World Heath Organization (WHO) will pool expertise to advise ...

Extreme Obesity can Shorten Life Expectancy Up to 14 Years: NCI Study

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Increased risks of dying at a young age from cancer and many other causes including heart disease, stroke, diabetes, and kidney and liver diseases, is found in adults with extreme obesity, reveal the results of an analysis of data pooled from 20 large studies of people from three countries. The study, led by researchers from the National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the National Institutes of Health, found that people with class III (or extreme) obesity had a dramatic reduction ...

Most Common Major Stressful Event in Americans' Lives is Health: Poll

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About half (49%)of the Americans report that they had a major stressful event or experience in the past year, many others (43%) report stressful experiences related to health. A new NPR/Robert Wood Johnson Foundation/Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) poll released today examines the role of stress in Americans' lives. More than half of those who experienced a great deal of stress in the past month say too many overall responsibilities and financial problems ...

Kidney Donation Safe for Healthy Older Adults - Implications in India

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Tobacco Use a Big 'No' for People With TB and Diabetes, Say Health Experts

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Health experts say tobacco use is hazardous for people living with diabetes and those suffering from or at risk of tuberculosis (TB). For the former it acts as an hindrance in their control of blood sugar and in case of the latter their ability to transmit the disease can be enhanced. Nicotine, which is accumulated in the body through smoking, reduces insulin sensitivity which proves detrimental in patients of diabetes. "Nicotine, which is a major component of ...

Child TB Problem More Serious Than Ever Before

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More than 650,000 children are falling ill with tuberculosis each year in the 22 worst affected countries. This is twenty-five percent more than what the UN had thought, UN specialists have observed. Reporting in The Lancet, they said that about 53 million children under 15 are living with latent TB infection, a condition that can develop into active TB at any time. A contagious disease of the lungs, TB is caused by a microbe called Mycobacterium tuberculosis. ...

Having an Obese Sibling Increases Childhood Obesity Risk

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A joint study conducted by researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital, Cornell University, and Duke University and published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine has found that having an obese sibling can also increase the obesity risk of other siblings. By surveying adults in 10,244 American households, investigators found that the likelihood of childhood obesity varies with the number of children in a household, as well as their gender. According ...

KoACT Dietary Supplement Found to Boost Bone Strength in Post-Menopausal Women

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A dietary supplement called KoACT, which combines a proprietary formulation of calcium and collagen, has been found to be beneficial for post-menopausal women as it can improve bone strength and flexibility. The research was conducted by Bahram H. Arjmandi, Ph. D, RD, who is currently Margaret A. Sitton Named Professor and Chair of the Department of Nutrition, Food, and Exercise Sciences at The Florida State University (FSU). Dr. Jennifer Gu, AIDP's ...

Blood Test for Early Detection of Alzheimer's Takes a Step Closer to Reality

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A blood test that can detect Alzheimer's disease took another step closer to reality after British researchers revealed that they have identified blood proteins present in people who are subsequently diagnosed with the condition. There is currently no cure for the brain-wasting disease, the most common form of dementia, which Alzheimer's Disease International estimates affects 44 million people worldwide, a figure set to triple by 2050. A test to diagnose ...

New York Governor Signs Bill That Legalizes Medical Marijuana

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New York became the 23rd state in the US to legalize marijuana for medical use after Governor Andrew Cuomo signed a bill allowing its use in treating certain diseases. The state's law requires a medical prescription for marijuana and limits its use to help treating patients with cancer, HIV, Lou Gehrig's disease, Parkinson's, epilepsy and a few other illnesses. Patients also must agree to sign up for the medical marijuana program. The number of distributing ...

Whey Protein Before Breakfast can Improve Blood Sugar Control Among Diabetics

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Consuming whey protein before a regular breakfast can not only reduce the blood sugar spikes seen among diabetics after meals but can also improve their insulin response, a new study published in the journal Diabetologia reveals. Thus whey protein could be an additional tool to help control blood sugar in patients with diabetes. The research was conducted in Israel by Professor Daniela Jakubowicz and Dr Julio Wainstein (Wolfson Medical Center, Tel Aviv University), ...

Preterm Babies Admitted to High Volume Care Units Less Likely to Die

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A new study published in the journal BMJ Open has found that the risk of death among preterm babies that are admitted to high volume neonatal units was lower compared to babies admitted to low volume units. Results demonstrated that for preterm babies born at less than 33 weeks gestation, the odds of dying in hospital were 32 per cent less if they were admitted to high volume units at the hospital of birth than if they were admitted to low volume units (odds ratio ...

Study Sheds New Light on Evolutionary Changes Between Closely Related Species Living in Different Ecologies

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An analysis of DNA of fruit flies by researchers from Virginia Bioinformatics Institute at Virginia Tech has shed new light on the genetic differences between flies that grow up in close, but extremely different, ecologies. One reason lies in a startling abundance of repetitive DNA elements that, until recently, were considered little more than unused letters in a word game. The explanation will be published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of ...

Brain Patterns in High Earners Show They are Able to Predict Market Bubbles

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After simulating market conditions to a group of investors, researchers at Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute and Caltech have found that the brain patterns of high earners were different from others. The former were able to predict market bubbles in which the price of something differed greatly from its actual value, a new study published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences reveals. "Stock market bubbles form when people collectively overvalue ...

Specialized Cells in Intestine and Airways Act as First Line of Defense Against Invading Microbes

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Researchers led by David Lo from UCR laboratory have found that certain specialized cells of epithelium, or the inner lining of the intestines and airways, act as the first line of defense against microbes and create an electrostatic repulsion field against the invading parasites. The study/a is featured on the cover/a of the July issue of emInfection and Immunity/em, a journal published by the American Society for Microbiology. Co-authors of the study are ...

Number of Expectant Mothers Taking to the Net for Pregnancy Advice on the Rise

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A new study conducted by Penn State researchers reveals that a growing number of pregnant women are taking to the Internet to seek answers to their medical questions. "We found that first-time moms were upset that their first prenatal visit did not occur until eight weeks into pregnancy," said Jennifer L. Kraschnewski, assistant professor of medicine and public health sciences, Penn State College of Medicine. "These women reported using Google and other search engines ...

Number of Ebola Cases in Sierra Leone Going Undetected, Say Experts

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Even as Sierra Leone continues to struggle in its battle of containing the recent Ebola virus outbreak, health experts and grassroots doctors in the country have warned that the situation could be worse than thought as a large number of Ebola cases are going undetected, a new report published in The Lancet reveals. The journal published the letter on the heels of ministerial talks in Ghana, where a senior UN health official on Thursday said the outbreak in West ...

Cotton Gauze Left Inside Stomach of Noida Woman After C-Section

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A 33-year old woman from Noida revealed that she had a large piece of cotton gauze inside her body for six months after undergoing Caesarean section operation to deliver her son at Fortis Hospital. Namrata Bhargava underwent the operation at the hospital in December and though she suffered from severe abdominal pains three days after the surgery, she did not take it seriously as she thought it to be the result of the surgery. However when her condition worsened, ...

Colchester Hospital Agrees to Pay 5.5 Million Compensation Over Meningitis Treatment Delay

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Colchester Hospital has agreed to pay a compensation of over 5.5 million at the London High Court after delays in treating a nine-year old meningitis patient meant that she was left with permanent brain damage. Ellie Sutton was eight months old when her GP suspected that she may be suffering from meningitis and recommended that her parents take her to the pediatric unit at the hospital. The doctors took her temperature and though they found it to be 39.9 degree Celsius, ...

Obesity: Major Risk Factors for COPD

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An article in emCMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal)/em claims that obesity, especially excessive belly fat, is a risk factor for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Excessive belly fat and low physical activity are linked to progression of the disease in people with COPD, but it is not known whether these modifiable factors are linked to new cases. A team of researchers in Germany and the United States looked at the relationship ...

Now, Automatic Contraception Via a Chip

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Birth control has now gone hi-tech after researchers at Massachusetts-based company MicroCHIPS revealed that they have developed a new chip that will provide automatic contraception to women for up to 16 years. According to the developers, once the chip is placed under the skin of a woman, it starts to release a daily dose of levonorgestrel, use in majority of the popular hormonal and emergency contraceptives. If a woman wants to start a family, then she can just turn ...

Teen Dating Takes a Violent Turn

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A new study finds that dating during the teen years takes a violent turn for nearly 1 in 6 young people, with both genders reporting acts like punching, pulling hair, shoving, and throwing things. The startling number, drawn from a University of Michigan Medical School survey of more than 4,000 adolescent patients ages 14 to 20 seeking emergency care, indicates that dating violence is common and affects both genders. Probing deeper, the study finds ...

Mechanism Revealed That Prevents Lethal Bacteria from Causing Invasive Disease

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An important development in understanding how the bacterium that causes pneumonia, meningitis and septicaemia remains harmlessly in the nose and throat has been discovered. The research took place at the University of Liverpool's Institute of Infection and Global Health. iStreptococcus pneumoniae/i is a 'commensal', which can live harmlessly in the nasopharynx as part of the body's natural bacterial flora. However, in the very young and old it can invade the ...

Less Exercise Responsible for Expanding Waistlines

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Sedentary lifestyle and not caloric intake may be to blame for increased obesity in the United States. This is according to a new analysis of data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). A study published in the iAmerican Journal of Medicine/i reveals that in the past 20 years there has been a sharp decrease in physical exercise and an increase in average body mass index (BMI), while caloric intake has remained steady. Investigators ...

What is The Best Choice for Closing a C-Section?

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In a study comparing sutures (stitches) versus surgical staples for closing a C-section, researchers found a 57 percent decrease in wound complications in women who were sutured versus those who received staples. By carefully addressing the concerns that previous studies had raised, the research shows a clear benefit of suture for women. "There has been ongoing debate in the field about the use of sutures versus staples," says senior author Vincenzo ...

Regeneration of Retinal Ganglion Cell Axons and Gene Therapy

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The adult mammalian central nervous system has only limited intrinsic capacity to regenerate connections after injury. Due to both intrinsic and extrinsic factors of the mature neuron, therapies are required to support the survival of injured neurons and to promote the long-distance regrowth of axons back to their original target structures. The retina and optic nerve are part of the CNS and this system is much used in experiments designed to test new ways of promoting ...

Visualization of Peripheral Nerve Regeneration Process

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At the Institute of Polymer Science and Engineering in Taipei, Taiwan, researchers led by Dr. Hsu have been involved in peripheral nerve regeneration research for more than ten years. Dr. Hsu and her team have focused on development of polymeric nerve conduits to facilitate peripheral nerve regeneration. To better translate the research from animal experiments to human therapies, they have recently paid more attention on clinically available methods to visualize ...

Dental Pulp Stem Cells Promote Regeneration of Retinal Cells After Injury: Study

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Researchers have discovered that stem cells isolated from the teeth, termed dental pulp stem cells (DPSC), can protect retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) from death following injury and promote regeneration of their axons along the optic nerve. The study was led by Dr. Ben Scheven, Dr. Wendy Leadbeater and Ben Mead at the University of Birmingham, UK. RGC loss is the leading cause of blindness and can arise through traumatic injury or degenerative diseases such as glaucoma. ...

Houshiheisan Maintains Stabilization of Neurovascular Units

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Cerebral ischemia injure neurons, and also involves the glial cells that provide a supportive scaffold to which the neurons are attached and the microvessels that provide energy for nervous tissue. Therefore, protection of a single neuron is not sufficient to recover nervous function, and more attention should be paid to maintenance of the function of entire neurovascular units. Houshiheisan compound is one of effective traditional Chinese compound ...

Blocking Cells' Movement may Stop Cancer Cells from Spreading

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New UCL research suggests that insights into how cells move through the body could lead to innovative techniques to stop cancer cells from spreading and causing secondary tumours. Scientists discovered that cells can change into an invasive, liquid-like state to readily navigate the narrow channels in our body. This transformation is triggered by chemical signals, which could be blocked in order to stop cancer cells from spreading. Most cancer deaths ...

New Study Provides Insight into HIV Infection

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A new study conducted by University of Adelaide researchers has provided insight into how the HIV virus greatly boosts its chances of spreading infection, and why HIV is so hard to combat. HIV infects human immune cells by turning the infection-fighting proteins of these cells into a "backdoor key" that lets the virus in. Recent research has found that another protein is involved as well. A peptide in semen that sticks together and forms structures known as ...

Alcohol Brands Heavily Advertised in Magazine are Popular With Underage Drinkers

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The brands of alcohol that are heavily advertised in magazines that young people read are the ones that are popular with underage drinkers, a new study finds. The findings, reported in July's iJournal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs/i, add to evidence that alcohol ads can encourage kids to drink. They also suggest that the alcohol industry's self-imposed standards on advertising are inadequate, said lead researcher Craig Ross, Ph.D., M.B.A., of the ...

Partial Knee Replacement Seems Safer Than Total Replacement

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A new study published in iThe Lancet/i today (July 8) reveals that partial knee replacement surgery is safer than total knee replacement. A team of researchers from the University of Oxford, funded by Arthritis Research UK and the Royal College of Surgeons, found that: ulliAlthough the risk of life-threatening complications from knee replacement surgery is very small, people who undergo total knee replacement are four times more likely to die ...

In High Volume Neonatal Centres, Premature Newborn Survival 30 Percent Higher

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In regard to critical care for newborns, which has been the focus of intense debate, the results of various studies seem to indicate that centralized care is linked to better outcomes. The advantage is particularly evident for very premature babies born after less than 27 weeks of pregnancy, where the figure rises to 50%, prompting the authors to conclude that new services for newborns should promote delivery of very preterm babies in high volume units. But ...

Leading Charity Slams 'atrophy' in Humanitarian Aid System

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Most desperate people in emergency situations are not getting help as risk-aversion and bureaucracy are increasingly stopping international agencies to take immediate steps, a leading medical charity said in a scathing report on Monday. In an analysis of recent major emergencies, Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF) or Doctors Without Borders said inflexibility was leading to "atrophy of the humanitarian system" despite greater funding and expertise than ever before. ...