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Hot Flashes Connected to Increased Risk of Hip Fracture

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Women who experience moderate to severe hot flashes and night sweats during menopause tend to have lower bone mineral density and higher rates of hip fracture than peers who do not have menopausal symptoms, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society''s iJournal of Clinical Endocrinology (and) Metabolism/i. Menopause is the life stage when a woman''s ovaries stop producing hormones and her menstrual periods stop. About 60 percent of women experience ...

Core Hospital Care Members may Surprise You

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Doctors and nurses are traditionally thought to be the primary caretakers of patients in a typical hospital setting. But according to a study at the burn center intensive care unit at Loyola University Health System, three physicians, a social worker and a dietitian were documented as the most central communicators of the patient clinical team. David Shoham, PhD, and colleagues were published in the American Burn Association's iJournal of Burn Care (and) Research/i. ...

Colombia Village's 'curse' Could Hold Alzheimer's Cure

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When John Jairo, a meticulous night watchman, lost his job for leaving all of his employer's doors open, his family knew they were hit by the "Yarumal curse." Yarumal, a Colombian village perched in the Andes Mountains, has a high incidence of a genetic mutation that predisposes its population to Alzheimer's - a bleak heritage that scientists now hope could help lead to a treatment to prevent the disease. Jairo is just 49 but his brain has already been ...

Study to Use Energy More Efficiently

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Stanford University researchers developed two different curriculum for Girl Scouts for the purpose of a randomized controlled trial so as to use energy more efficiently: one on energy use at home, and the other in transportation and food. Both courses were effective for girls in the short term, and the home energy course was effective for girls in the long term and for parents in the short term. Subsequently, the Northern California Girl Scouts began disseminating ...

Why Some People are Better Navigators?

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The part of the brain that tells us the direction to travel when we navigate has been identified by UCL scientists, and the strength of its signal predicts how well people can navigate. It has long been known that some people are better at navigating than others, but until now it has been unclear why. The latest study, funded by the Wellcome Trust and published in iCurrent Biology/i, shows that the strength and reliability of 'homing signals' in the human brain ...

HIV Mucosal Transmission: Cell-Association

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Dr. Deborah Anderson and her colleagues from the Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) are studying the transmission of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and challenging dogma about it. Most research has focused on infection by free viral particles, while this group proposes that HIV is also transmitted by infected cells. While inside cells, HIV is protected from antibodies and other antiviral factors, and cell-to-cell virus transmission occurs very efficiently ...

Functioning of Endogenous Retroviruses in the Immune Response Identified by Scientists

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Contagious scourges like AIDS, Cancer are known to be caused by Retroviruses. But researchers at UTASouthwestern Medical Center and Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm, Sweden, found that endogenous retroviruses (ERV) also play a critical role in the body's immune defense against common bacterial and viral pathogens. "Most scientists have become used to the view that retroviruses are generally harmful," said Nobel Laureate, Professor and Director of ...

Researchers Map Out How Childhood Brain Tumors Relapse

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Researchers have discovered the unique genetic paths that the childhood brain tumour medulloblastoma follows when the disease comes back, according to research published in iCancer Cell/i. The study - funded by Cancer Research UK, Action Medical Research and others - shows that taking an extra tumour sample at recurrence, when there are no effective therapies, could identify subsets of patients that might be treatable with existing drugs that target the genetic ...

Discovery in the Fight Against Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria

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There are two main families of bacteria: those that are surrounded by a single membrane (or one outer wall) and those that are surrounded by two membranes (or two outer walls). The team of Jean-Francois Collet, professor at the de Duve Institute at UCL, looked at this second type of bacteria. For a bacterium to survive, it has to keep its two outer walls intact. If one of these walls is damaged, the bacterium dies. So it was vital for the UCL researchers to analyse ...

Quiz on Skin Infections

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Skin infections are caused by bacteria, viruses, fungi or parasites. Factors such as injuries, poor hygiene, humidity, and weak immune system increase risk of skin infection.

New Stem Cell Research Offers Clues to Cancer Treatment

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A latest research by Joshua Brickman and his research team from Danish Stem Cell Center (Danstem) at the University of Copenhagen specifically has found that inhibiting or blocking stem cells ability to make a specific decision, leads to better cell growth and could lead to defined ways to differentiate stem cells. This research is the first comprehensive analysis of a pathway important for stem and cancer cell decisions known as Erk. As a result this work could ...

Ebola Infection - How to Prevent and Control It - Slide Show

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Ebola is a viral infection. This infection is extremely dangerous and it must be immediately contained to prevent an Ebola outbreak.

Advanced Cell Culture Technique Paves Way for Tailor-Made Cancer Treatments

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In a development that could lead to a deeper understanding of cancer and better early-stage treatment of the disease, University of Michigan researchers have devised a reliable way to grow a certain type of cancer cells from patients outside the body for study. The new technique is more than three times as effective as previous methods. Researchers say it's a major step forward in the study of circulating tumor cells, which are shed from tumors and ...

Rick Ross Sheds 85 Pounds the Healthy Way

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Rick Ross, the famous rapper shed 85 pounds in the past year and chose to do it the healthy way. A regular healthy eating regimen, crossfit workouts, sound sleep and a drastic cut down of alcohol and soda made him fit and healthy. His health has improved after the weight loss, which was an outcome of the two seizures he had in 2011. "Two years ago I suffered two seizures," Rick told Good morning America. "I woke up from that. I was like, I really need ...

EU Says Obesity can be Disability

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The European Union's highest court has ruled that obesity can be considered a 'disability' if it hinders the overweight person's performance at work. The European Court of Justice had been asked by a Danish court to consider the case of a child minder in Denmark who said he was fired four years ago because he is obese. The employee, Karsten Kaltoft, filed a suit to obtain damages and interests from the municipality of Billund who employed him as a child ...

Smart Crows: Research through Relational Matches

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A recent research has revealed the smartness of crows. The sample cup in the middle was covered with a small card on which was pictured a color, shape or number of items. The other two cups were also covered with cards - one that matched the sample and one that did not. During this initial training period, the cup with the matching card contained two mealworms; the crows were rewarded with these food items when they chose the matching card, but they received no food when they ...

Minute Genetic Ancestry Differences Revealed in the US

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Recent study reveals minute differences in genetic ancestry of people across the United States. 23andMe, Inc., the leading personal genetics company, announced the publication of this study. Since immigrants first arrived more than four hundred years ago, the United States has served as a meeting place for peoples from different continents. This study illuminates how American history and the ongoing mixing of peoples with African, European, and American origins ...

Relocation of Rural Natives to Urban Areas Elevate Cortisol Levels and Risk Of Diabetes

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Susceptibility to diabetes and metabolic disorders is high among people who relocate from rural to urban areas. In developing nations, people shift from rural areas to cities and this escalates stress levels which affects their hormone levels and make them more susceptible to diabetes and other metabolic disorders. About 387 million people worldwide have diabetes, and 77 percent of them live in low and middle-income countries, according to the International Diabetes ...

Recovery from Spinal Cord Injury - Trigger Mechanism Revealed

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Recent research reveals that the human body can partially recover the basic motor functions after an incomplete injury of the spinal cord. So-called muscle spindles and associated sensory circuits back to the spinal cord promote the establishment of novel neuronal connections after injury. This circuit-level mechanism behind the process of motor recovery was elucidated by Prof. Silvia Arber's research group at the Biozentrum, University of Basel and the Friedrich Miescher Institute ...

Exons are Smaller Fragments of Genes and are Vital for Neurone Maturation

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All the cells in a human body include same genomic information. Infact, genome is the cell's book of instructions. But, each of the cells read the gene fragments that are of most interest to them so as to carry out their function. So, neurones, hepatocytes and cardiac cells are different although their genome is the same. In order to achieve this huge variety of functions from the same genome, the cells employ a mechanism known as alternative splicing. This enables them to ...

Ciliopathies are Diagnosable Using New, Innovative Technique

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Cilia forms the most vital biological structures that line the windpipe. Its tails and antennas brush all the junk we inhale and it also helps us see, smell and reproduce. When a mutation disrupts the function or structure of cilia, the effects on the human body are devastating and sometimes lethal. The challenge in diagnosing, studying and treating these genetic disorders, called ciliopathies, is the small size of cilia - about 500-times thinner than a piece of ...

Similarity in Characteristics of the Brain in All Invertebrates

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Learning and memory are critical functions that we constantly employ in daily life. It may be studying intensively for an exam over a short period of time or searching for the car keys. It turns out that the structure and function of brain centers responsible for learning and memory in a wide range of invertebrate species may possibly share the same fundamental characteristics, according to a new study published in the journal iCurrent Biology/i and performed ...

Adverse Effects of High-fat Diet can be Tackled With Wild Blueberries

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The adverse effects of a high-fat diet can be diminished by eating bilberries (wild blueberries), says a recent study at the University of Eastern Finland. Bilberries were shown to have beneficial effects for the first time, on both blood pressure and nutrition-derived inflammatory responses. Low-grade inflammation and elevated blood pressure are often associated with obesity-related diseases. The study focused on the health effects of bilberries on mice that were ...

Flood Threat for Majority US Coastal Areas by 2050

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By 2050, majority of US coastal areas are likely to be threatened by flooding for 30 or more days each year due to dramatically accelerating impacts from sea level rise, according to a new NOAA study. NOAA scientists Sweet and Joseph Park established a frequency-based benchmark for what they call 'tipping points', when flooding, defined by NOAA's National Weather Service as between one to two feet above local high tide, occurs more than 30 or more times a year. Based ...

Hormone Replacement Therapy for Treating Menopausal Symptoms in Younger Women

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Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) is the most effective treatment for menopausal symptoms, particularly for younger women at the onset of menopause, according to a new review published in 'The Obstetrician (and) Gynaecologist'. Menopausal symptoms, including hot flushes and night sweats are common, affecting around 70% of women for an average of 5 years but may continue for many years in about 10% of women. HRT is a medical treatment for menopause. It provides low doses ...

Immigration Enforcement Policies Negatively Affect the Health of Immigrant Hispanics

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Existing state and local enforcement of federal immigration laws can have an adverse impact on the use of health care services by immigrant Hispanics, according researchers at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center. The study focused on the use of prenatal care by Hispanic women shortly before and after implementation of Section 287(g) of the Immigration and Nationality Act, which authorizes U.S. Immigration and Custom Enforcement to enter into agreements with state and ...

Kidney Donors With Hypertension May Have Better Kidney Health Following Donation

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A new study has revealed that while hypertension can have negative effects on the kidneys, older kidney donors with high blood pressure may have good kidney health following kidney donation. Researchers found that after removal of a kidney, the remaining healthy kidney usually does about 40% more work to compensate. 51 living kidney donors were part of the study conducted by Jane Tan, MD, PhD (Stanford University) and her colleagues. The investigators looked at the safety ...

High Parental Education Increases Discrimination, Depression Risk in Black Young Adults

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High socioeconomic status (SES), particularly higher parental education, increases the risk of depression for black youth, according to a study conducted by The MassGeneral Hospital for Children (MGHfC). Senior author Elizabeth Goodman, MD, of the MGHfC Division of General Academic Pediatrics said, "High socioeconomic status, particularly higher parent education, is known to be protective against depressive symptoms in young adults. For black youth, we found that higher ...

Korean Mistletoe Affects Fat Metabolism in the Liver and can Help Fight Obesity-related Liver Disease

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Researchers have found that a compound, viscothionin, produced by Korean mistletoe affects fat metabolism in the liver and could help fight obesity-related liver disease. Previous research had shown that extracts from the plant have anti-obesity effects. However, there was no clarity on the specific molecules involved. Researchers Jungkee Kwon and colleagues noted that Korean mistletoe produces several biologically active compounds like steroids and flavonoids, and identified ...