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Subsequent Transmission of the Ebola Virus Has Made It More Severe

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Scientists at the University of Liverpool studied the Zaire Ebola strain, which is responsible for the current Ebola outbreak in West Africa, and found that subsequent transmission of the virus has caused it to 'hot up' and become more severe. The research team analyzed the viruses at different stages in an animal system to understand how it gains strength when it spreads from animals to humans and then from human-to-human contact. They were able to identify several ...

People Have to 'Turn On' Their Memories in Order to Remember Something

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Just seeing or hearing something is not going to help people remember it, according to Penn State psychologists. Researchers said that people might have to 'turn on' their memories in order to remember even the simplest details of an experience. They have named this finding as 'attribute amnesia' which indicated that memory was far more selective than previously thought. Researchers pointed out that people's expectations play an important role in determining what ...

People Associate Unhealthy Food With Being Tasty

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New research by Kiel University, Germany, has shown that unhealthy food is widely associated with being tasty, and taste is the main driver of food decisions. During the study, participants were given a variety of yogurts that differed in sugar and fat quantity. Even when they were given information about the ingredients, this was not sufficient to encourage people to choose the healthier yogurt. This strategy was especially ineffective for people who needed it ...

Wolves, like dogs can be Man's Best Friend, Proves Research

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Behavioural scientists from the Messerli Research Institute at the Vetmeduni Vienna and the Wolf Science Centre studied the origins of dog-human relationship. They showed that the ancestors of dogs, the wolves, are at least as attentive to members of their species and to humans as dogs are. Researchers said that the social skill did not emerge during domestication, but was already present in wolves. "Dogs have become tolerant and attentive ...

Cancer Risk Boosted by Formaldehyde in E-Cigarettes

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E-cigarettes produce the toxic chemical formaldehyde when heated to the maximum and inhaled deeply. This makes e-cigarettes up to 15 times more cancerous than regular cigarettes, US researchers said Wednesday. E-cigarettes are battery powered devices that heat up a liquid containing nicotine and artificial flavoring. The vapor is inhaled, much like a cigarette. While some say e-cigarettes may help tobacco smokers kick the habit, others are concerned ...

Eating Walnuts Improves Performance on Cognitive Function Tests

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Eating walnuts may improve performance on cognitive function tests, including those for memory, concentration and information processing speed, according to a new research at the University of California, Los Angeles. The study findings suggest that cognitive function was consistently greater in adult participants who consumed walnuts, regardless of age, gender or ethnicity. The study led by Dr. Lenore Arab analyzed the effects of walnut intake on cognitive function. ...

An Alternative to Knee Replacement Surgery Specifically for the Elderly

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A convenient fast track knee replacement (FTKR) surgery alternative to the conventional procedure was attempted to reduce the post-operative trauma in a knee replacement surgery. A team of doctors headed by Neelam Ramana Reddy, joint replacement surgeon at Star Hospitals, has performed a FTKR surgery. FTKR is an evidence-based procedure with maximum outcome for patients suffering from severe degeneration of the knee joint that require total knee replacement. ...

AYUSH Expo to Promote Nature's Best for Well Being

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The Indian medical systems are given a push by the state government to boost medical tourism. An AYUSH expo was organised by the state AYUSH Department and the Federation of Indian Chambers of Commerce and Industry to promote the use of nature at its best for overall well being. Various AYUSH products are available for sale at the exhibition, and visitors can get a free medical check-up as well. U.T. Khader, Health Minister said, "The state ...

Health Benefits of Cashew Nuts

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There are many health benefits of cashew nuts. Cashew nuts can be eaten raw or roasted and can be used to make many healthy recipes.

First Swine Flu Death in Amirstar Sets Alert Over the State

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The health authorities in Amritsar are set on alert across the state after the first death due to swine flu in the state. The government as well as private hospitals have been requested to ensure isolated wards and adequate staff to deal with such patients. Dr Chauhan, district epidemiologist said that what had baffled the medical fraternity in the city was that the patient had no known history of travel to any area affected by swine flu or any interaction ...

Out of State Health Insurance Pushed

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Supporters of Senate Bill 131 which allowed individuals and businesses to buy health insurance from out of state insurers would encourage market competition and keep the premiums low and more affordable was what supporters of the bill felt. When similar bills were introduced earlier they did not have much impact. Now with the introduction of The Affordable Care Act 10 essential services have to be offered in all the 50 states and each state would decide on what these essential ...

New Cancer-Fighting Strategy from Johns Hopkins Would Harden Cells To Prevent Metastasis

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Existing cancer therapies are geared toward massacring tumor cells, but Johns Hopkins researchers propose a different strategy: subtly hardening cancer cells to prevent them from invading new areas of the body. They devised a way of screening compounds for the desired effect and have identified a compound that shows promise in fighting pancreatic cancer. Their study appears this week in the early edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. ...

Ebola Tested Negative but Haemorrhagic Fever Alert in Gujarat and Rajasthan

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In spite of fears, a 35-year-old man from Jodhpur, was admitted to AIIMS on Tuesday that he had contracted Ebola. He died the next morning due to excessive internal bleeding. The patient has tested negative for Ebola at the National Centre for Disease Control (NCDC) and appears to have been suffering from Crimean-Congo Haemorrhagic Fever (CCHF) a disease caused by a tick-borne virus (Nairovirus). CCHF is an infection spread by animals and people who ...

Diet and Alzheimer's Disease

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Alzheimer's begins with forgetfulness, but over time affects speech and coordination along with drastic behavioral changes. The right diet may lower your risk by 40%. So isn't a diet change worth it?

Swine Flu Panic in Telangana as the Death Toll Increases

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The death toll in Telangana rises to 19 since winter and over 150 people have tested positive for the H1N1 virus. The panic has spread among the medical staff as two doctors of Gandhi General Hospital and one from Osmania General Hospital have also tested positive to swine flu. Telangana Chief Minister K Chandrasekhara Rao on Wednesday called the state health department for a determined effort to tackle the spread of swine flu. Prime Minister ...

Brain Cancer: Long-Term Use of Hormonal Contraceptives may Increase Your Risk

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Taking a hormonal contraceptive for at least five years is associated with a possible increase in a young woman's risk of developing a rare tumour, glioma of the brain. This project focussed on women aged 15-49 years and the findings are published in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology. Hormonal contraceptives, including oral contraceptives, contain female sex hormones and are widely used by women all over the world. While only a little is known ...

Tobacco Firms in England Might Have to Sell Cigarettes in Plain Packaging

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In the ongoing parliament session, the British government will be seeking a vote on forcing tobacco firms to sell cigarettes in plain packaging. The opposition Labor party also welcomed the announcement, indicating that such a measure would be likely to pass in parliament, but it was criticized by business groups that said it would encourage a black market. The regulations follow suit after a similar step by Australia, which introduced standard drab packaging for ...

WHO Reports Significant Drop in Ebola Cases in West Africa

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The World Health Organization (WHO) reported a significant drop in the Ebola cases in the three West African countries; with only 8 cases reported in Liberia last week, 20 confirmed cases in Guinea last week against 45 the week before and 117 in Sierra Leone last week against 184 a week ago. WHO added that Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone were now adequately equipped to stem the deadly Ebola epidemic. Mali, Senegal and Nigeria have been declared Ebola-free after ...

Prolonged Use of Left Ventricular Assist Devices Induces Heart Muscle Regeneration

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Long term use of a left ventricular assist device (LVAD) by patients with heart failure may induce regeneration of heart muscle by preventing oxidative damage to a cell-regulator mechanism, according to investigators atUT Southwestern Medical Center. Heart failure is a debilitating disease in which the hear cannot pump blood efficiently and hence cannot provide sufficient oxygen to organs throughout the body. LVADs are mechanical pumps that substitute for the damaged ...

Probable Case of Mad Cow Disease Detected in Norway

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The Norwegian Veterinary Institute has detected a probable case of mad cow disease with a second positive test for bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) on a 15-year-old cow, but urged consumers not to panic as it may not be the same variant as the British 1990s epidemic. A definitive diagnosis of the case can only be made by a European reference laboratory in Britain. Bjoern Roethe Knudtsen of the Food and Safety Authority said, "We have a likely and strong suspicion ...

Bisphenol A Poses No Health Risk

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The EU food safety watchdog said that bisphenol A --a chemical used in food can linings and other products-- poses no health risk to consumers. But it also slashed recommended exposure levels to the compound as tests to detect it become more refined. "BPA poses no health risk to consumers because current exposure to the chemical is too low to cause harm," the European Food Safety Authority said. EFSA said its conclusions applied to all age ...

Nigeria Confirms H5N1 Bird Flu in Five States

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Nigeria confirmed that five states have been hit with the H5N1 strain of bird flu, resulting in the deaths of tens of thousands of poultry. Agriculture Minister Akinwumi Adesina said the first cases were confirmed on a commercial farm in the northern city of Kano and at a live bird market in Lagos State on January 8. "While we quickly confirmed that the cases were due to H5, we could not at the time determine the biotype. We have now confirmed that ...

No Polio Cases Reported in Syria for a Year: WHO

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After a massive immunisation campaign triggered by the disease's appearance in the war-torn country, Syria has gone a year without a reported polio case, the World Health Organization said. The agency said "the outbreak seems to have been brought under control" in Syria after a push to immunise millions of children across the Middle East. "It's a very encouraging sign that Syria's returning to a polio-free status," Chris Maher, the WHO's polio eradication ...

A Rebel Pharmacy Seeks to Ease Pain In Ukraine War Zone

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In Ukraine's war zone, inside a ramshackle and once-abandoned pharmacy in Donetsk, Doctor Andrei Volkov is thrilled. Medicine -- 150 bags of it -- has just arrived. But Volkov won't earn any money from it. He plans to give it away for free. "But we don't have enough of it," Volkov, 41 and thin with brown hair, said of such donations. "About 200 to 250 people come here every day, and half of them leave without the medicine they need." Shortages ...

Rutgers Appoints Jasjit Ahluwalia as Dean of School of Public Health

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Jasjit Ahluwalia, an eminent Indian-origin researcher has been appointed as dean of the public health school at the prestigious Rutgers University in the US state of New Jersey. He will assume his new role as dean of the Rutgers School of Public Health from April 2015. Ahluwalia is a nationally recognised researcher in the field of health disparities and minority health, and nicotine addiction. He is also engaged in global health work with ...

AIIMS Bhopal 300-bed Hospital by February

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Expect a fully functional 300-bedded hospital at All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS) Bhopal by February, according to the institute director Dr Sandeep Kumar. "Seven operation theatres and 14 intensive care units will be functional, besides 30 units in Ayush department along with a well-equipped pathology wing. We hope to have a 300-bedded hospital functional within a month," said Dr Kumar. AIIMS Bhopal is struggling to cope with ...

UK's First Successful Newborn Organ Transplant

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British doctors have turned a tragedy into a medical milestone by transplanting the organs of a six-day-old baby girl. The baby's liver cells were donated to two other patients after the baby's heart stopped beating. According to the doctors, the girl was born with severe brain damage having been starved of oxygen in the womb. Medicos praised the "extraordinary generosity" of the girl's parents. "The successful transplants had turned ...

Poor Sleep Leads To Risky Behavior

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A new study monitoring sleep in teenagers has found that a lack of it can directly increase risky behavior. The study states that sleep doesn't just lead to better health, it leads to better judgement as well. Researchers discovered this from an analysis of survey data taken from more than 6,500 adolescents. This survey occurred in three waves across the U.S. from 1994 to 2002. Initially, it was found that poor sleep was linked to higher rates ...

Woman and Child Die of Bird Flu in Egypt, Death Toll Rises to 5

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A woman and child died of H5N1 bird flu, the Egyptian health ministry announced on Monday. Egyptian health ministry spokesman Hossam Abdel Ghaffar said that the six-year-old child died in Minya province on Monday evening, after a 47-year-old woman succumbed to the disease in Assiut province earlier in the day. According to the official, the total number of flu cases detected so far this year has risen to 20. This includes five deaths ...

Potential Molecular Marker for Aggressive Brain Tumors

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A somatic mutation in the ATRX gene has been found to be a potential molecular marker for aggressive brain tumors, such as gliomas, neuroblastomas and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. Now, for the first time, researchers at at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania have found that the same mutated gene may serve as a much-needed biomarker for the pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas (PCC/PGL) that become malignant. These rare neuroendocrine ...

Teenage Drinking Induced by Alcohol Ads on TV

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Alcohol was found to be the most common addiction among young people and a new study has revealed that alcohol ads on television induce teenage drinking. In 2013, 66.2 percent of U.S. high school students reported trying alcohol, 34.9 percent reported alcohol use in the past 30 days and 20.8 percent reported recent binge drinking. In the U.S. alone, producers of alcohol spend billions of dollars annually marketing their products. And, unlike cigarettes, ...

Dust on Ocean Floor is 25M-Year-Old, Clues to Supernovae Hypotheses

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The galactic dust from the last 25 million years that has settled on the ocean floor has been analysed and has provided new insight into supernovae theories. They have analysed extraterrestrial dust thought to be from supernovae, which has settled on ocean floors to determine the amount of heavy elements created by the massive explosions. Anton Wallner, from the Research School of Physics and Engineering at The Australian National University (ANU), said ...

Childhood Psychiatric Problem Could Indicate Antisocial Behavior

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Researchers have found that if a child is throws tantrums troublesome and such behavior is prolonged or especially intense, the child may have conduct disorder, a childhood psychiatric problem that could be an indication of antisocial behavior. Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis found that certain symptoms of conduct disorder indicate problems which are likely to continue as kids reach school age. They recommend that children ...

Novel Treatment to Stop Rotavirus Infection

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Rotavirus is one of the most common causes of severe infectious diarrhea in children. The virus is transmitted by the faecal-oral route. It infects and damages the cells that line the small intestine and causes gastroenteritis which is often called "stomach flu" despite having no relation to influenza. It causes discomfort with accompanying cramps, dehydration and fever. While this may be an inconvenient hassle to parents in developed countries, it can mean death ...