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Indian Surgeons Carry Out First Successful Double Hand Transplant surgery

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Surgeons at the Kochi-based Amrita Institute of Medical Sciences have registered a rear feat of carrying out the world's first successful hand transplant of a colored skin and the first hand transplant in any developing country. The transplant surgery was carried out on January 12 and 13 to a train accident victim, 30-year-old Manu, who received both the hands of a 24-year-old road accident victim. The total expense for the transplant was borne by Mata Amritanandamayiu Math. ...

Canada Confirms Second Bird Flu Case

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A second case of bird flu has been confirmed in Canada's westernmost British Columbia province. On Monday, tests confirmed the first human case of H7N9 bird flu in North America in a Canadian woman who had just returned home from a trip to China, while her husband's diagnosis was confirmed three days later. The couple in their 50s began feeling sick days after returning home. Canada's chief public health officer, Gregory Taylor said, "Since both cases became symptomatic ...

Researchers Unveil Reason Behind the Divergence of Mammals Instead of Having Same Genes

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Researchers led by European Molecular Biology Laboratory have revealed the reason of rich diversity in mammals. They examined genome sequences in around 29 mammals and compared gene regulation in liver cells from 20 key species and found out the reason behind the divergence of mammals instead of having same genes. They explained ways to turn changes in the genome into differences between species which included change of protein sequence, or by changing the way promoters ...

New Skin-Based Generator Device Converts Muscle Movements into Enough Power for Small Electronics

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A new flexible postage-stamp-sized generator device that converts muscle movements into enough power for small electronics, using human skin as one of its charge-collectors has been developed by researchers at the National University of Singapore. This device takes advantage of static electricity to convert mechanical energy into electrical energy. Researchers demonstrated that the new device, which can generate 90 volts of open circuit voltage and power of 0.8mW ...

Hydrogen Sulfide Gas Helps Lower Heart Rate, Blood Pressure, Blood Vessel Stiffness

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A new compound, called AP39, which generates minute quantities of hydrogen sulfide gas inside cells, could be beneficial in cases of high blood pressure and diseases of the blood vessels that occur with ageing and diabetes, according to scientists at University of Exeter Medical School. Animal studies of AP39 have revealed that administration of the compound to animals with high blood pressure significantly lowered heart rate, blood pressure and blood vessel stiffness. ...

Texting Could Aid in Treating Mentally Ill Patients

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Texting may be a more suitable than mobile applications when it comes to treat mentally ill patients, according to scientists at Clemson's School of Computing. Kelly Caine, who led the study said, "Cell phone technology was in the hands of millions of Americans and early research indicates that it could be useful to help people suffering from some form of mental illness." Researchers surveyed 325 patients currently receiving treatment at community-based ...

Uruguay's Marijuana Law Faces an Uncertain Future

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After Uruguay moved to legalize marijuana in 2013, the approach has taken root in Latin America with other countries now considering a revamp of their own drug laws. "Someone has to start in South America," Uruguayan President Jose Mujica said in late 2013 as he unveiled plans to make cannabis legal in his country. Under Mujica, Uruguay became the first country in the world to fully legalize marijuana all the way from the cannabis field to the joint, ...

Spanish Hospital Uses Stem Cell Therapy to Treat Damaged Hearts

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For the first time a Spanish hospital has successfully used stem cells culled from healthy donors to treat seven heart attack victims. Madrid's Gregorio Maranon hospital plans to treat 55 patients in all with the technique in a clinical trial, the regional Madrid government which runs the hospital said in a statement. "Seven patients have already been operated on and they have progressed very well despite having suffered serious damage to their heart ...

Men Take Twice as Many Selfies as Women: Study

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A new research has shown that men take twice more selfies and share them online as compared to women. The smartphone company HTC surveyed 2,000 Britishers and found that a quarter of men shares selfies to make their ex or current partner jealous, the Daily Star reported. The researchers found that men post an average of three self portraits each week as compared to women who post 1.6 pictures. The survey disclosed that men capture their ...

British Woman Claims to Have Hundreds of Near Death Experiences

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Beverley Gilmour has claimed that she has experienced around hundreds of near death experiences in her lifetime. She claimed to be the only British person to be receiving medical treatment for chronic near-death experiences, the Daily Express reported. A graphic designer by profession said that she had been going through near death experiences (NDE) three times in a month since 1987. Ms Gilmour explained she suffers from severe headaches ...

People Remain Sexually Active Even in Their Old Age

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A new study has claimed that people aged over 70 too enjoy an active sex life. According to new research from The University of Manchester and NatCen Social Research, more than half (54 percent) of men and almost a third (31 percent) of women over the age of 70 reported they were still sexually active, with a third of these men and women having frequent sex - meaning at least twice a month. It is the first study on sexual health of its kind to include ...

The More Depressed You Are, the More Likely You are to Watch TV

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People who are more depressed and lonely tend to indulge in watching marathon sessions of the TV shows, reveals a new study. Yoon Hi Sung, Eun Yeon Kang and Wei-Na Lee from the University of Texas at Austin conducted a survey on 316 18- to 29-year-olds on how often they watched TV; how often they had feelings of loneliness, depression and self-regulation deficiency; and finally on how often they binge-watched TV. They found that the more lonely and ...

Paris Fashion Week Delivers Sad World Escapism

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Paris's haute couture fashion week -- which came to a close -- is hard to beat. The outside world might be suffering economic austerity, or the fear of Islamist attacks, or simply a winter to chill the bones. But inside the warm, gilded bubble offered to the jetset designer crowd, a springtime fantasy was stage-managed to the smallest detail that banished anything resembling real-world woes. Women with perfect noses and similar-though-exclusive ...

Unhealthy Food Makes It Difficult for Kim Kardashian to Lose Baby Fat

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The secret behind Kim Kardashian's slow baby fat reduction is because she doesn't have time to cook healthy food. The American reality star said that she started looking a nutritionist, as she used to eat really bad, but now the star is back on the healthy eating track with right workouts, People Magazine reported. The American TV personality added that after pregnancy she didn't know what to cook and how to make it healthier, that's the reason she ...

Madonna Stopped Taking Drugs

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Madonna admitted that she quit taking drugs as she doesn't have the required stamina to take them. The 'Like A Virgin' singer revealed to a magazine that that she went through a stint of trying out drugs during her younger years, but sooner she realised that it was destroying her day by day, the Mirror reported. The 56-year-old singer added that when she used to take drugs she wouldn't be able to get out of bed for days afterwards, and used to feel ...

Tokyo Topped the List of World's Safest City

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Tokyo and Singapore has topped the list of world's safest city listed down by The Economist. The Economist's Safe Cities Index looked at 50 cities and ranked them on more than 40 metrics that spanned four main categories i.e. digital security, health security, infrastructure safety and personal safety, the Huffington Post reported. Osaka, Japan and Stockholm, Sweden were ranked at third and fourth spot respectively. Amsterdam, the Netherlands, ...

Skin-Care Tips to Help Grooms Give Competition to Brides on 'Wedding Day'

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Those days are gone when men simply turned up for their wedding and the focus was only on the bride. Men today are becoming increasingly conscious of their appearance and put in a lot of effort to look their best on their wedding day. Dr. Sirisha Singh, the founding member and partner consultant of The Skin Center, has revealed some easy tips from for the would-be grooms to give competition to their brides on their big day. 1. Start early ...

International Meet in March to Plan Rebuilding of Ebola-hit States

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A U.N. envoy has said that governments and international organizations plan to meet in March to work out how to rebuild three West African nations whose economies have been shattered by Ebola. Though the number of newly detected cases of Ebola virus infection has been dropping sharply in Sierra Leone, Guinea and Liberia in recent weeks, the three countries are still reeling from the impact of the outbreak. The World Bank last January reported ...

Rapid Test Kit Detects Dengue Antibodies from Saliva

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Finding out whether you have been infected with dengue may soon be as easy as spitting into a rapid test kit. The Institute of Bioengineering and Nanotechnology (IBN) of ASTAR has developed a paper-based disposable device that will allow dengue-specific antibodies to be detected easily from saliva within 20 minutes. This device is currently undergoing further development for commercialization. IBN Executive Director Professor Jackie Y. Ying shared, "Our ...

Canada Tackles the Complex Issue of Adult Obesity

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The Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care (Task Force) has issued its latest guidelines on adult obesity prevention and management. Adult obesity in Canada has nearly tripled in the past 40 years. Today 67% of men and 54% of women are considered overweight or obese making adult obesity one of Canada's most pressing public health challenges. The Task Force's guidelines provide evidence-based recommendations designed to help primary care doctors play ...

Nagaland Ranks Second Among Tobacco Users in India

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Nagaland is the second largest consumer of tobacco products in India with 57% of the population into the habit, says the latest data released by Kohima District Tobacco Control Cell (KDTCC). Total population of the state stands at 20 lakhs. The statistics becomes serious as 37% of students are into smoking habits while 41% school children are smokeless tobacco users. Asenla Jamir, psychologist at KDTCC, said there are one billion smokers in the world of which ...

Increase in H7N9 Bird Flu Cases in South China's Guangdong

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Three more human cases of H7N9 bird flu have added the tally to 28 in south China's Guangdong Province since the start of the year, according to the local authorities. Guangdong, which borders Hong Kong, has entered the high-incidence period for bird flu, which usually crops up in winter and spring seasons. The provincial health and family planning commission in a statement said that the three cases were reported last Wednesday in cities of Shenzhen, ...

Skin Patch Uses Muscle Motion to Power Wearables

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A new flexible generator converts muscle movements into enough power for small electronics, using human skin as one of its charge-collectors. The postage-stamp-sized device takes advantage of static electricity to convert mechanical energy into electrical energy. Such friction-powered generators could usher new types of wearable sensors that don't require batteries but instead are powered by the wearer's daily activities like walking, talking or holding an ...

5 Benefits of Weight Loss Surgery

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For someone suffering with severe obesity, doing everything to shed pounds and work toward a healthy weight isn't just a good idea, it's essential for their health. Severe obesity leads to a range of potentially debilitating issues; many of them quite serious such as heart failure, stroke, and a much higher risk of developing diabetes, high blood pressure, and even cancer. The medical community's consensus is that bariatric surgery is the best tool to fight severe ...

Depression Drugs Linked to Dental Implant Failures

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A recent study from McGill University found that dental implant procedures may be twice as likely to fail in patients who are using common antidepressants. According to the researchers, Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors, or SSRIs, may reduce bone formation, which can complicate the osseointegration process that must occur for a successful implantation. Researchers evaluated six years' worth of dental implants records and followed up with patients between ...

Weight Loss Helps Both Expectant Mom and Child

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Before a woman gets pregnant it is very common for her to plan and prepare for her child's arrival to ensure that the baby will benefit from the healthiest, most comfortable life possible. Sometimes, these preparations may be financial or they may involve taking such important healthcare steps as quitting smoking. Now, according to data from the Swedish Medical Birth Register, one of the best things that a mother can do for the health of her child is ...

High Cholesterol Levels Is An Independent Heart Disease Risk Factor

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Researchers at the Duke Clinical Research Institute suggest that according to a 20 year follow-up study, even slightly high cholesterol levels can have long-term health impacts. The chances of heart disease in healthy adults between the ages of 35 and 55 increases by 39 percent if their cholesterol levels are high and when it increases every decade. Navar-Boggan and colleagues at Duke, Boston University and McGill University examined data on 1,478 adults ...