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Two Minute Test to Identify Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder

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Scientists at Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute have developed a brain-imaging technique that may be able to identify children with autism spectrum disorder in just two minutes. This test, offers promising diagnostic potential while far from being used as the clinical standard of care, once it undergoes more research and evaluation. "Our brains have a perspective-tracking response that monitors, for example, whether it's your turn or my turn. ...

Improve Your Skin With a Urine-Massage

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Massaging urine into your skin and face can help beat acne and troublesome complexions, reveals a new study, due to its anti-bacterial and anti-fungal properties. Martha Christy, author of 'In Your Own Perfect Medicine,' said that the anti-bacterial and anti-fungal properties of wee can help boost immunity and prevent disease, the Daily Express reported. Christy, who claims that the mineral-rich yellow liquid can combat acne, eczema and psoriasis as ...

Women With Helicobacter Infection are Less Prone to Multiple Sclerosis

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Australian Nobel Prize laureates Professor Barry J. Marshall and Professor Robin Warren discovered Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) bacteria to be the cause of cause of stomach ulcers. A new study of about 850 people found that women infected with the bacteria were less likely to have Multiple Sclerosis (MS) than women not infected. But men are three times less likely to develop the autoimmune disease compared to women. Infections like H. pylori ...

Brain Health Improved in Adults With Regular Exercise

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Oxygen availability in brain, which is known to positively related to brain health and function, is higher in adults who exercise regularly, found a new study. The study has suggested that exercising regularly could boost the brain health in adults. In the brain, blood flow and cognitive function peak during young adulthood, but a new study of 52 young women found that oxygen availability, which is known to positively relate to brain health and function, is higher ...

Processing Emotions is Different in Men and Women

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Women find emotional images more emotionally stimulating than men and were more likely to remember them, but there are no gender-related differences in emotional appraisal to neutral images, a new study has revealed. A large-scale study by a research team at the University of Basel focused on determining the gender-dependent relationship between emotions, memory performance and brain activity. With the help of 3,398 test subjects from four sub-trials, ...

Positive and Negative News Shared Differently on Facebook

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People posting important life events - whether positive or negative news - on Facebook is better understood after a new study. In the article 'How Are Important Life Events Disclosed on Facebook? Relationships with Likelihood of Sharing and Privacy,' Jennifer Bevan, Chapman University, Orange, CA, focused on when Facebook users share information on important life events, do they prefer to do so directly (detailed status updated or wall posts) or indirectly (photos, ...

Skull Bone of Draft Patient Misplaced by Doctors

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The skull bone, which was earlier, preserved for brain graft surgery in the hospital of a 21 year old was misplaced by doctors in Sher-i-Kashmir Institute of Medical Sciences (SKIMS). Inam Muzaffar of Rawalpora met with an accident in November and was admitted in SKIMS as he was critically injured. "He had received critical injuries in his head. In SKIMS, the doctors conducted his brain surgery and he was admitted for about 15 days. At that time, ...

Type 1 Diabetes Development Halted in Lab

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Preventing type 1 diabetes in animal model has been achieved by scientists. Type 1 diabetes is a chronic autoimmune disease that results from the destruction of insulin producing pancreatic beta cells. Type I diabetes is a chronic autoimmune disease that occurs when the body's immune system destroys insulin producing pancreatic beta cells, resulting in insulin deficiency and hyperglycemia and current treatments for type I diabetes focus on controlling blood sugar ...

BPA Exposure During Pregnancy Causes Oxidative Stress in Both the Mother and Offspring

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Exposure to bisphenol A (BPA) during pregnancy can cause oxidative stress in both the mother and offspring, that increase the risk of developing diabetes or heart disease later in life, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's journal Endocrinology. BPA is a chemical used to manufacture plastics and epoxy resins. It is found in a variety of consumer products, including plastic bottles, food cans and cash register receipts. Previous research ...

Telangana CM Seeks Center's Help to Contain Swine Flu

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In order to prevent the spread of swine flu in the state, Telangana Chief Minister Chandrashekara Rao spoke to Prime Minister Narendra Modi to seek the Center's help to contain the virus. 13 people have lost their lives due to the ailment so far. The Chief Minister has reportedly asked for special medical teams and necessary assistance in the form of aid. He also called for an emergency cabinet meeting in Hyderabad to discuss the measures to be taken to tackle the ...

Melanoma Risk Lowered by Coffee

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Coffee seems to have a protective effect against cutaneous melanoma, lowering the risk of the skin disease among coffee drinkers, suggested a new study. Erikka Loftfield, M.P.H., of the Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, used data from the NIH-AARP Diet and Health study to determine if there was an association between coffee consumption and risk of cutaneous melanoma. Information on coffee consumption was obtained ...

Boost Up More Funds for 'New Era of Medicine': Obama

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US President Barack Obama on Tuesday called for the United States to lead the way toward a "new era of medicine" by boosting funds for modern medical research. During his State of the Union speech, Obama said a key area of focus should be a fast-growing field known as precision medicine, which aims to deliver the best treatment for cancer and other illnesses based on an individual's genetics. "I want the country that eliminated polio and mapped the human ...

Most Young People Prefer an Egalitarian` Relationship

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Most young people today want to be in an egalitarian relationships, where work and family responsibilities are equally shared, according to researchers from the University of Texas at Austin and the University of California-Santa Barbara. Researchers conducted a new study with a nationally representative sample of unmarried, childless men and women between the ages of 18 and 32 in the United States. The study participants were asked how they would ideally like to ...

AIDS Crisis Picking Up Fast in Crimea and East Ukraine: UN

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The serious AIDS crisis is brewing in Russian-annexed Crimea and war-torn eastern Ukraine, where the injecting drug users have lost access to therapy to wean them off heroin, the UN's AIDS envoy said Wednesday. Out of 805 people in Crimea who before annexation were receiving opioid substitution therapy (OST) -- a tried and tested UN-backed treatment -- "between 80 and 100" have now died, Michel Kazatchkine told journalists. "The causes of death, from ...

Stem Cells Capable of Regenerating Bone and Cartilage Identified

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A stem cell capable of regenerating both bone and cartilage has been identified in bone marrow of mice. The discovery by researchers at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) is reported today in the online issue of the journal Cell. The cells, called osteochondroreticular (OCR) stem cells, were discovered by tracking a protein expressed by the cells. Using this marker, the researchers found that OCR cells self-renew and generate key bone and cartilage ...

Healthier IVF Babies Now

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Children born from artificial fertilization have much better chance of survival and good health due to better techniques and policies, said a Scandinavian study on Wednesday. Doctors looked at data from 1988 to 2007 from Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden for more than 92,000 children born through assisted reproduction technology (ART), the term for in-vitro and other methods. Of them, more than 62,000 were single births, also called singletons, and ...

Drug for Treatment of AIDS Awaits FDA Approval

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Banglore-based Strides Arcolab and Gilead Sciences have signed a licensing agreement under which Gilead has extended non-exclusive rights to Strides to make and distribute Tenofovir Alafenamide (TAF), both as a single agent product and in combination with other drugs. TAF is a novel nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitor used in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) patients in the treatment of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). TAF is awaiting ...

New High-Speed 3D Microscope Can Give Deeper View of Living Things

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Opening new doors for biomedical and neuroscience research, Elizabeth Hillman, associate professor of biomedical engineering at Columbia Engineering and of radiology at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC), has developed a new microscope that can image living things in 3D at very high speeds. In doing so, she has overcome some of the major hurdles faced by existing technologies, delivering 10 to 100 times faster 3D imaging speeds than laser scanning ...

Women's Healthy Weight Day 2015

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It's Time to Bring Down the Prevalence of Non-communicable Diseases

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Global Status Report estimates nearly 52 million lives globally would be a prey to Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) by the year 2030. NCDs such as heart disease, diabetes, lung disease and cancers killed 38 million people globally in 2012 among which 8.5 million were South-East Asians. The report emphasized that this number is expected to grow larger if we do not act now to arrest this epidemic. Nearly 60 percent of all deaths in India, ...

Interesting Facts and Statistics about Malaria

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Malaria is endemic to many parts of the world. Many lack basic knowledge about preventive measures or medications to fight malaria. Learn about some useful and interesting malaria facts.

Union Minister Stresses on Local Manufacturing of Food Products

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The Union Minister for Health and Family Welfare Shri J P Nadda has stressed on the need to have safe and wholesome food, and local manufacturing of food products under the 'Make in India' campaign of the Government of India. In order to ensure that food that is consumed is safe, healthy and wholesome, and the manufacturing process adheres to standards and procedures under the mandate of the Food Safety and Standard Authority (FSSA) Act 2006, the Health ...

Is it Skin Deep: Why You Should Not Peel Your Fruits and Vegetables

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Trying to eat healthy, we unwittingly discard most of the nutrients by peeling fruits and veggies. Peels are actually richer in antioxidants and vitamin C as compared to the fruit pulp.

Hyderabad Police Temporarily Suspend the Use of Alcohol Breath Analysers

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Ten cases of swine flu is reported in Telangana, India, out of which three have died. Out of the three, two were treated in Osmania hospital, Hyderabad. 185 people have tested positive for the deadly H1N1 virus. As precautionary measures to prevent the spread of the virus, the Hyderabad police have temporarily suspended their drink driving check. Breath analysers are used to test if a driver is under the influence of alcohol. The driver is ...

Karnataka First in India to Give Universal Health Coverage

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On 20th January, Karnataka became the first state in the country to provide universal health coverage with the launch of two schemes, the Rajiv Arogya Bhagya for APL households and the Jyothi Sanjeevini for government employees. The health coverage will cost the government approximately Rs. 120 crore annually. Chief Minister Siddaramaiah, who launched the schemes, said APL family members would be entitled for a health care costing up to Rs. 1.5 lakh a year. In ...

70 Percent Have No Health Insurance in India: Study

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In a recent study seventy percent of India's population has no health insurance, and in comparison with the global benchmark the country is short by 2 million beds compared with the global benchmark. The report 'AarogyaBharat2015', released by NATHEALTH today, stated thatIndiarequires US (Dollar) 3 trillion in cumulative funding and has the potential to generate 15 to 20 million jobs by 2025. NATHEALTH has been created to improve access and quality of healthcare ...

Drinking More Fluids Cuts the Risk of Kidney Stones

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Plenty of water a day may keep the kidney stones away. The new guidelines issued by the American College of Physicians advocate drinking at least 2 liters of water per day so as to prevent recurrence of kidney stones. Life is provided "as is" and without any warranties, so you have to incur damages arising from use or misuse. Problems like kidney stones could arise at any time; may seem serious and encompassing in the heat of the moment, but it will eventually ...

Americans With No Health Insurance Could be Shocked by the Obamacare Penalties

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Many Americans who did not enroll for health insurance last year could end up paying more than the (Dollar) 95 as penalty. Under the Affordable Care Act all those who did not qualify for one of the exemptions would pay a minimum of (Dollar) 95 but for the upper and middle income families - 1% of the household income as their penalty would equate to much more. TurboTax, an online tax service, estimated that the average penalty for lacking health insurance in 2014 would be (Dollar) 301. "People ...

Neonatal Ghrelin Linked to Obesity, Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease

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Neonatal ghrelin (gut-derived hormone) directly influences development in the part of the brain related to appetite and the regulation of metabolism. Our subconscious motivation to eat is powerfully and dynamically regulated by this hormone signals. The study by The Saban Research Institute of Children's Hospital Los Angeles suggests a link between maturation of the gut-brain axis and later susceptibility to obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. The body ...

Hospitalization Due to Pneumonia Increases Risk of Heart Attack, Stroke

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Hospitalization due to pneumonia could increase a person's risk of heart attack or stroke in the following weeks and months, even in patients with no previous history of cardiovascular disease, according to a study by Canadian researchers which is published in the Journal of the American Medical Association. Researchers analyzed health records of more than 3,800 people enrolled in US community health studies, with one group aged 45-64 years and the other over 65 ...

World Bank Trims Estimates of Economic Damage of the Ebola Epidemic

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Last October the World Bank estimated that the Ebola epidemic would result in (Dollar) 25 billion economic losses across all of West Africa. However, with Ebola now broadly contained, the World Bank trimmed its estimates of economic damage of the Ebola epidemic to (Dollar) 6.2 billion. But, warned that the three main affected countries, Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone would still bear a heavy cost. For these three countries, where most of the infections and deaths have been ...

Need to Address Problems Arising Out of Carbon Dioxide Emission

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Union Minister of Railways, Suresh Prabhakar Prabhu said it was imperative that challenges and problems arising out of carbon dioxide emissions are addressed approximately. The Minister released a book "Carbon Capture, Storage and Utilization (CCSU)" which deals with the issue of mitigating climate change concerns arising out of emission of carbon dioxide in atmosphere. It is a collection of papers prepared by eminent authors. R.V. Shahi is the Former ...

Bioethicists Call for Return to Asylums for Long-Term Psychiatric Care

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As the United States population has doubled since 1955, the number of inpatient psychiatric beds in U.S. has been cut by nearly 95 percent to just 45,000. It is a wholly inadequate equation when considering that there are currently 10 million U.S. residents with serious mental illness. A new viewpoint in JAMA, written by Dominic Sisti, PhD, Andrea Segal, MS, and Ezekiel Emanuel, MD, PhD, of the department of Medical Ethics and Health Policy in the Perelman School ...